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Register for a VEX ROBOTC Summer Training Course Today!

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PD Banner VEX
 

Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy has a great offering of certified technology training scheduled for VEX this summer, both online and on-site in Pittsburgh, PA!

Register for one of their ROBOTC VEX classes today!

Robotics Academy On-Site Training Includes:

  • Online access to supplemental lessons from Robotics Academy materials
  • Technical support for all hardware and software used in the class
  • 24/7 access to class management system, forums, and message boards (monitored daily)
  • Opportunities for Continuing Education credits and certificate of completion
  • Tour of the National Robotics Engineering Center

Benefits of Robotics Academy Online Training Courses:

  • Convenient online training gives you access from home or your school via the Internet.
  • Online access to supplemental lessons from other Robotics Academy materials.
  • Technical support for all hardware and software used in the class.
  • At the end of the course, take the certification test to become a Robotics Academy Certified Instructor.
  • Certificate of Completion upon course completion to apply for Continuing Education hours.
  • 24/7 access to class forums and message boards (monitored daily)


Robotics Academy ROBOTC for VEX EDR Certified Technology Training

VEXROBOTC
 

This course focuses on learning how to program CORTEX robots, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts.

On-Site Course Dates:

July 11th – 15th, 2016
August 1st – 5th, 2016

Sign up for an on-site course here!

Online Course Date:

Jun 20th – 24th, 2016
Monday – Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EST (12 – 2pm PST)

Sign up for an online course here!


Robotics Academy ROBOTC for VEX IQ Certified Technology Training

VEXIQROBOTC
 

This course focuses on learning how to program IQ robots, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts.

On-Site Course Dates:

June 20th – 24, 2016
July 18th – 22nd, 2016

Sign up for an on-site course here!

Online Course Date:

Aug 1st – 5th, 2016
Monday – Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EST (12 – 2pm PST)

Sign up for an online course here!

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

April 11th, 2016 at 6:05 am

Sign Up for a Summer LEGO Professional Development Course!

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Professional Development Banner LEGO
 

Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy has a great offering of certified technology training scheduled for LEGO this summer, both online and on-site in Pittsburgh, PA!

Register for one of their EV3 classes today!

Robotics Academy On-Site Training Includes:

  • Online access to supplemental lessons from Robotics Academy materials
  • Technical support for all hardware and software used in the class
  • 24/7 access to class management system, forums, and message boards (monitored daily)
  • Opportunities for Continuing Education credits and certificate of completion
  • Tour of the National Robotics Engineering Center

Benefits of Robotics Academy Online Training Courses:

  • Convenient online training gives you access from home or your school via the Internet.
  • Online access to supplemental lessons from other Robotics Academy materials.
  • Technical support for all hardware and software used in the class.
  • At the end of the course, take the certification test to become a Robotics Academy Certified Instructor.
  • Certificate of Completion upon course completion to apply for Continuing Education hours.
  • 24/7 access to class forums and message boards (monitored daily)


Robotics Academy ROBOTC for LEGO NXT and EV3 Certified Technology Training

LEGOROBOTC
 

This course focuses on learning how to program NXT and EV3-based robots using ROBOTC, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts.

On-Site Course Dates:

June 27th – July 1st, 2016

Sign up for an on-site course here!

Online Course Date:

Jul 11th – 15th, 2016
Monday – Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EST (12 – 2pm PST)

Sign up for an online course here!

 

 

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

April 11th, 2016 at 6:00 am

VEX ROBOTC Online Trainings Start in February!

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VEX Teacher Training

Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy has announced their latest online VEX ROBOTC training schedule! The classes start in February and you can enjoy the convenience of taking Robotics Academy courses without leaving your own computer workstation! 

Register for one of their ROBOTC VEX classes today!

 
Benefits of Robotics Academy Online Training Courses:

  • Convenient online training gives you access from home or your school via the Internet.
  • Online access to supplemental lessons from other Robotics Academy materials.
  • Technical support for all hardware and software used in the class.
  • At the end of the course, take the certification test to become a Robotics Academy Certified Instructor.
  • Certificate of Completion upon course completion to apply for Continuing Education hours.
  • 24/7 access to class forums and message boards (monitored daily)


Robotics Academy Certified ROBOTC Online Training for VEX CORTEX

VEXROBOTC

This course focuses on learning how to program CORTEX robots, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts. Included with the course is online access to the Robotics Academy’s ROBOTC Video Trainer for CORTEX for one month starting the first day of class.

Feb 23rd – Mar 29th, 2016
Tuesdays for 6 weeks
6 – 8pm EST (3 – 5pm PST)

 


Robotics Academy Certified ROBOTC Online Training for VEX IQ

VEXIQROBOTC

This course focuses on learning how to program IQ robots, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts. Included with the course is a free copy of the VEX IQ curriculum (upon completion).

Feb 22nd – Mar 28th, 2016
Mondays for 6 weeks
6 – 8pm EST (3 – 5pm PST)
 

Register for one of their ROBOTC VEX classes today!

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

November 18th, 2015 at 6:05 am

Online LEGO Professional Development Courses Start this February!

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Teacher Training 2

Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy has announced their latest online LEGO ROBOTC training schedule! The class starts in February and you can enjoy the convenience of taking Robotics Academy courses without leaving your own computer workstation!

Register for their ROBOTC EV3 class today!

Benefits of Robotics Academy Online Training Courses:

  • Convenient online training gives you access from home or your school via the Internet.
  • Online access to supplemental lessons from other Robotics Academy materials.
  • Technical support for all hardware and software used in the class.
  • At the end of the course, take the certification test to become a Robotics Academy Certified Instructor.
  • Certificate of Completion upon course completion to apply for Continuing Education hours.
  • 24/7 access to class forums and message boards (monitored daily)


Robotics Academy Certified ROBOTC Online Training for LEGO NXT and EV3

LEGOROBOTC

This course focuses on learning how to program NXT and EV3-based robots using ROBOTC, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts.

Feb 25th – Mar 31st, 2016
Thursdays for 6 weeks
6 – 8pm EST (3 – 5pm PST)
 
 

Register for their ROBOTC EV3 class today!

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

November 18th, 2015 at 6:00 am

What’s the Big Idea? Using your STEM Classroom to Teach What Matters

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Computer Science

Computers are an everyday part of life. We use them constantly in our personal lives and in the workplace. According the the U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics, over 50% of jobs today require some level of technology skills. And, that percentage is expected to grow to almost 80% in the next ten years.

There’s no question that computer science skills are helping students succeed. But, computer science is about more than just learning to program. Students also need to learn how to think programmatically, to use programming as a problem-solving tool, and to understand the global impact of computer science and computing.

The most effective STEM programs include what are sometimes called the “Big Ideas” of computer science – foundational principles that are central to computing and help show students how computer science can change the world. Here’s a quick overview of some of the big ideas we think are important, and some tips on how you can incorporate them into your STEM Robotics or Computer Science classroom:

  1. Abstraction – Abstraction is a key problem-solving technique that we use in our everyday lives and that can be applied across disciplines and problems. Abstraction helps students manage complexity by reducing the information and details of a problem, allowing them to focus on the main idea. But how do you teach students abstraction?

One way is to Implement a project that start with a complex problem but uses mini-challenges to break the problem into smaller pieces. Have students solve the mini-challenges, focusing on one aspect of the problem at a time, and then use those mini-challenge solutions to build a final solution to the larger, more complex problem.

Algorithm2. Algorithms – Algorithms are used to develop and express computational problems and they’re an important part of Computer Science. But, algorithmic thinking is a tool that students can apply across disciplines and problems. Algorithmic thinking means defining a series of ordered steps you can take to solve a problem. Therefore, it’s important that students learn how to not only develop algorithms, but to also learn how to express algorithms in language, connect problems to algorithmic solutions, and evaluate algorithms effectively and analytically.

Here’s one idea for introducing algorithms into your STEM Robotics or Computer Science classroom: Provide students with a list of numbers. Ask them to find the largest number and document the procedure they used. (This is also good pseudocode practice!) Next, tell students that they will be given a program that generates 10 random numbers between 0 and 30 and they will have to provide an algorithm to find the largest number from the list. Once students have generated the algorithm and seen it in action, discuss why the algorithm is valuable. While it may not be a big deal to find the largest number out of a group of 10, what if we increased the range of numbers from 0 to 10,000, and increased the amount of numbers from 10 to 1000? In a situation like that, an algorithm would be able to find the largest number much faster than a human.

Computational
3. Computational Thinking – Computational thinking is a basic a problem-solving process that can be applied to any domain. This makes computational thinking an important skill for all students, and it’s why our curriculum is structured to teach students how to use computational thinking to be precise with their language, base their decisions on data, use a systematic way of thinking to recognize patterns and trends, and break down larger problems into smaller chunks that can be more easily solved.

To learn more about implementing computational thinking in your classroom, read our blog post from last month, “What is Computational Thinking and Why Should You Care?

Creativity4. Creativity – People often think that science and creativity are two terms that don’t belong together. However, that couldn’t be further from the truth. Innovation and creativity are at the heart of STEM and Computer Science. Along with programming skills, students need to learn how to think creatively and need to get comfortable with the creative process.

One great way to do this is by using structured problem-solving in your classroom. Structured problem-solving allows students to be creative, but within parameters. While students will still have opportunities to personalize their projects and justify their solutions, their creativity will still be structured. That way, teachers don’t have to worry about students constantly losing focus.

5. Data – This “Big Idea” revolves around the fact that data and information facilitate the creation of knowledge. Over the past 50 years, the tasks that we perform on a routine basis have gotten more and more complex. According to an analysis done by Frank Levy and Richard J. Murane, the amount that employees are asked to solve unstructured problems and acquire and make sense of new information has increased dramatically, by more than 40% .[i] Therefore, it’s important to teach students how to analyze and interpret data.

You can do this by having students use coordinate data to code precise movements. Or, ask students to design a short, school-appropriate survey to collect data and answer specific questions. Then, have students write a program to input and analyze their data and calculate basic descriptive statistics such as mean, mode, range, and frequency. You can also ask students to plot their data on a chart or graph, and identify subgroups within the dataset to explain response patterns. Finally ask students to draw conclusions or make generalizations from their data and present their results to the class.


2_2-4_mc_bossOnRoad6. Impact
– Computers have had a global impact on the way we think and live. The way we work, play, collaborate, communicate, and do business has changed dramatically in recent years and will likely continue to change. It’s important for students to understand the global impact of computing in everyday life, and the numerous ways computing helps enable innovation in other fields.

One way to help students understand the impact of computer science is to use activities that involve things like the internet, cybersecurity, internet searches, and the power of programming within advertising. You can also create activities that ask students to connect their programming skills to content from other classes (science, math, etc.). Or, you can ask students to think about and report on the less obvious ways they use technology every day, such as making breakfast, driving in a car, using the self-checkout line at the grocery store, etc.

7. Precision
– Programming is precise. It’s important for students to learn that a computer program will do exactly what they tell it to do. This is especially evident with robots. If you aren’t precise about what you tell your robots to do, they probably won’t do what you want. However, precision does not need to be complex. Even simple programming activities can require precise, thoughtful communication – How far should the robot move? How far should it turn?

 

 

Ultimately, we’re asking students to change the way they think about giving directions. So, a great activity is to have students create a set of instructions explaining how to do a task like following a recipe, drawing a house, or making a paper airplane. Have one student provide the instructions and a second student act as a robot, doing exactly what student #1 is telling him or her to do. Most times, it quickly becomes apparent that students have not fully considered the level of detail required for programming and that they need to be more precise with how they provide instructions.

If you’re looking for more ideas on how to integrate “Big Ideas” into your STEM classroom, we’ve embedded these “Big Ideas” into our research-based curriculum, which is available for free online, or through the purchase of a classroom edition that comes with the benefits of:

  • Guaranteed Uptime – Keep your classroom up, even if your internet is down.
  • Zero bandwidth requirements – 30 kids accessing the same curriculum can really slow things down.
  • High Quality Support – Have a question or need help getting started? You’ll have access to our best-in-class support team.
  • Individual curriculum access for each student or group – With individual access to the curriculum, students can move at the instructional pace that’s right for them.

 

[i] http://content.thirdway.org/publications/714/Dancing-With-Robots.pdf

Written by LeeAnn Baronett

November 11th, 2015 at 6:00 am

5 Ways to Engage Students in Your STEM Classroom

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VEX Engage Kids

There is a direct connection between student engagement and student learning! But how do you engage kids in learning? Contextualized activities that relate learning to real-world applications provide great opportunities to teach big ideas in mathematics, engineering, and computational thinking, all while keeping students engaged. If you pick the right activities, students learn because they want to, not because they’re being told, “you need to.”

But, do we really know what students will need to know as adults? Not long ago, it was important to learn to type, but now we have voice recognition software that gets better with every new release. And most of us were taught to read an analog clock, write in cursive, and balance a checkbook, all skills that are no longer necessary in today’s world.

IMG_7195While we may not know exactly what our students will need to know as adults, we know they need to learn “enduring understandings,” things like how to solve problems, how to reason, how to break big problems into smaller problems, and how to organize ideas. Contextualized problem-solving activities, which integrate learning with the development of 21st century skills, are a great way to engage students in learning and teach enduring understandings.

In today’s world, we find new “smart systems” integrated across all industry sectors (medical, banking, transportation, manufacturing, entertainment, etc.). These systems are robotic in nature, which makes robotics engineering problems a great choice to provide contextualize student learning. Here are just a few of the ways you can use robotics in your STEM classroom to keep students engaged:

Use Project Based Learning (PBL) Activities

IMG_2181PBL activities are great because the place the responsibility of developing a solution directly in students’ hands. Studies show that students learning in a PBL environment often retain far more than students who sit passively in class and listen to lectures. PBL activities have also been shown to improve students’ attitudes about your class, and also help develop their critical thinking, communication, and creative thinking skills. [1],[2]

Robotic engineering activities are inherently an engaging, PBL activity. However, if you want students to develop the enduring understandings that take place in well thought out lessons, the activities need to be scaffolded and foregrounded in very specific ways. For teachers new to robotics project-based learning, check out our free online VEX and LEGO curriculum, which are designed for introductory through advanced classrooms.

Already have a robotics program but need more ideas? Check out this Teacher POV blog post for some ideas on using robotics in your STEM classroom.

Hold an in-class robotics competition 

Robotics competitions have been proven to develop 21st century skills and teach important mathematics, computational thinking, and engineering skills. They also provide a fun way to motivate students and keep them engaged.

Build-BetterBut, implementing in-class competitions can be expensive on multiple fronts: the cost of kits for every student, student class time to iterate on solutions, and prep time to implement the actual competition. Our suggestion is to implement a virtual competition as a capstone activity, using Robot Virtual Worlds. Virtual competitions can be direct simulations of existing competitions, or can be hybrid competitions using one of the game worlds that are available. Or, they can even be games that students create using the Level Builder and the Model Importer.

Model ImporterAlthough virtual competitions may appear to be programming centric, they can also be used to develop teamwork and collaboration (I will solve this part of the problem while you work on that part), develop problem solving and engineering competencies (your team is responsible to develop a virtual robotics challenge that demands that students use feedback from the robot’s ultrasonic and gyro to solve the problems), and develop college and career readiness skills (you have to show your research and present your findings to the class). In other words, virtual competitions provide a unique opportunity for students to practice programming, develop engineering competencies, and have fun!

Beltway1-300x169Here’s a Teacher POV blog post about how you can use a game like VEX IQ Beltway to create an in-class competition. Another option for an in-class robotics competition is to use Robot Virtual Worlds in conjunction with our curriculum to create a scaffold learning experience for your students that’s both exciting and engaging. The schedule below shows how to implement the contest as part of a semester-long project: 

 

 

 

RVW_Teaching_Calendar copy

 

Using Mini-lessons

VEX Mini ChallengeKids attention spans are short, in the 8 – 14 minute range. That makes it difficult to hold their attention in a 50-minute lesson. This is where mini-lessons can help. Mini-lessons are short, 10 – 15 minute lessons that focus on a specific concept or skill. With mini-lessons, not only are you better able to keep students’ attention, you also give them the chance to to practice applying what they’re learning, one step at a time.

Our Robot Virtual Worlds software is a great fit for mini robotics lessons. In fact, we have mini lessons built into our free online curriculum, for both VEX and LEGO.

Here are a few other ideas for Robot Virtual Worlds mini-lessons:

  • Use the Measurement Toolkit to plot out a path, then have your students do the math to hit each waypoint
  • Use the Level Builder to teach basic game design principles like obstacles, checkpoints, and goals
  • Write a Roomba-like maze solving algorithm (move forward to a wall, then turn right, repeat forever) to navigate custom mazes in the Level Builder

Incorporate student input and interests into your lessons

Students learn better when they take an active role in their own learning. Incorporating students input and interests into your lessons is a great way to get students engaged.

Screenshot-2014-01-15_14.12.03One way you can do this with robotics is to take student input into account when designing projects and challenges. One option is to use Robot Virtual Worlds, along with the Level Builder, to to create different challenges for students to choose from. Or, even better, have students use the Level Builder to design their own challenges!

Another way to incorporate students into your planning is to use automated assessment tools to track students progress and make intelligent instructional decision about what topics students need more help with.

Here’s one way you can use Robot Virtual Worlds to direct your instruction: Create a challenge in the Robot Virtual World Level Builder that asks students to utilize different programming concepts. You’ll be able to see what skills students are struggling with, and can design your lessons accordingly.

Show students how what they’re learning is relevant

tank-girlOne of the biggest complaints students have about engineering and math is that it’s hard for them to see how it’s relevant to their world. By programming robots, students can see how what they’re learning has a direct impact in the real world, and can see how individual math and engineering elements come together to form a solution to a real problem.

Here’s a great blog post from Ross Hartley, a teacher in the Pickerington Local School District, about using robotics to provide contextualized learning and have kids solve real-world problems.

New to Robotics?

If you’re new to robotics, check out this video from Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy, which talks about the engaging nature of robotics, and the cools things you can do.

 

 

[1] “Summary of Research on Project-Based Learning.” Center of Excellence In Leadership of Learning (2011): n. pag. University of Indianapolis, June 2009. Web.

[2] Grant, M.M (2011). Learning. Beliefs, and Products: Students’ Perspectives with Project-based Learning. Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-Based Learning, 5(2).

Written by LeeAnn Baronett

October 6th, 2015 at 6:00 am

Extend Your STEM Robotics Classroom with Robot Virtual Worlds

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Teacher Feedback

Whether you’re just starting a robotics program, or you’ve been teaching robotics for years, you’re probably on the lookout for new and interesting activities to keep your students engaged and learning. Robomatter’s Robot Virtual Worlds, a high-end simulation environment that enables students to learn programming without a physical robot, is a great tool to help.

Palm Island GameThrough classroom environments, competitions environments, and game environments, Robot Virtual Worlds enables you to create a scaffold learning experience to teach students important math, programming, proportional reasoning, and computational thinking skills.

And, by combining Robot Virtual Worlds with our curriculum, you gain access to step-by-step tutorial videos that teach students how to program using motors, sensors and remote control, as well as practice challenges that allow students to apply what they’ve learned in either a virtual or physical robot environment.
Designed to complement a physical robot classroom, Robot Virtual Worlds is a natural fit for teachers who have limited budgets. But, not only does Robot Virtual Worlds help you do more with fewer resources, you can also use it to enhance your students’ STEM experience.

Here are just a few ideas:

Create an In-Class Robotics Competition: Robotics competitions are a great way to motivate students and keep them engaged. But, they also provide a great opportunity to teach important math, programming, proportional reasoning, and computational thinking skills. By using Robot Virtual Worlds in conjunction with our curriculum, you can create a scaffold learning experience for your students that’s both exciting and engaging. The schedule below is just one idea for how you can use an in-class Robot Virtual Worlds competition in your classroom:

RVW_Teaching_Calendar copy

RVW Info 03

Use it as a Pre-Assessment: When students return from summer break, some will have retained all or most of what they learned the previous year. Others will have retained far less. But how do you know? Most teachers work under the assumption that they need to review everything before moving on to a new concept. Using a pre-assessment can help you make intelligent instructional decision about what you need to review and when you can move on. Here’s one way you can use Robot Virtual Worlds as a pre-assessment to direct your instruction: Create a challenge in the Robot Virtual World Level Builder that asks students to utilize different programming concepts. You’ll be able to see what skills the students have retained and what skills you need to review, and that can be a tremendous time-saver.

RVW Info 05

Use it to Manage Students Working at Different Levels: One of the hardest things for a teacher to do is teach to each individual student’s current instructional level. Robot Virtual Worlds can help. Let’s say you have a student who is struggling to learn some of the beginning ROBOTC concepts and another that is breezing through the curriculum. With Robot Virtual Worlds, you can easily differentiate instruction by using the Robot Virtual World Level Builder to create a challenge for each student. Additionally, if students are working in Palm Island or Operation Reset, you can have one student program their robot to make turns while using timing, and have the other student use the Gyro Sensor. That means you can differentiate instruction within the SAME lesson.

RVW Info 02

Assign Robotics Homework: One of the problems with using physical robots alone is that there often aren’t enough robots for each student to have their own. And, even if there were, you might not want to have students take the robots home, for all sorts of reasons. With Robot Virtual Worlds and the Homework Pack, you can easily assign robotics homework without having to worry about managing the logistics of physical robots. The Homework Pack allows students to have their own individual licenses to use Robot Virtual Worlds at home. The Homework Packs also come in handy for students who have missed class and need to make up work.

Measurement

Mathematize Solutions: With the Robot Virtual Worlds Measurement Toolkit, students don’t need to guess how far a robot needs to travel to solve programming problems. With intelligent path planning and navigation, you can have students do the math, show their work, and explain how they solved the problem.

RVW Info 04

Get New Students up to Speed: As teachers, your days are filled with the unexpected. One of the most challenging surprises is when you are told that you will have a new student in class because the student just moved to your district. Your class may be three or four months into the ROBOTC curriculum, and your new student may have no ROBOTC or programming experience. Here is where Robot Virtual Worlds came be a lifesaver. Instead of having the new student jump into whatever challenge your students are doing with physical robots, you can have the new student watch the lessons from the ROBOTC Curriculum and complete the challenges in the Curriculum Companion Pack. After the student begins to learn some ROBOTC basics, he or she can be introduced to the challenge that the rest of class is working on.

Go to robotvirtualworlds.com to learn more and get started with a free, 10-day trial!

Featured Tools and Products:

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Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

September 1st, 2015 at 6:15 am

5 Tips to Help You Streamline Your STEM Robotics Classroom

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Blog - 5 Tips STEM

Running a STEM robotics classroom can seem a little overwhelming, especially if resources are tight. How can you keep your classroom running smoothly if you don’t have a lot of resources? It’s easier than you might think. Here are a few tips to help:

Screenshot-2014-01-15_14.12.031. Use virtual robots. Virtual robots, like Robot Virtual Worlds, are a great way to add to your robotics classroom without adding to your costs. Designed to supplement physical robots, Robot Virtual Worlds allows you to teach robotics with fewer robots and more easily organize and keep track of your classroom.

You can also more easily mange students who are working at different levels, assign robotics homework, and use simulated fantasy worlds to capture students’ imaginations and make learning fun. Visit robotvirtualworlds.com to get started with a free 10-day trial.

 

2. Explore grants and other funding options. Curious about grants but don’t know where to start? There are a lot of grants and funding for STEM teachers, if you only know where to look.

Project Lead The Way has a great list of grants, as well as some information on citizen philanthropy on its site.  And, Edutopia’s “Big List of Educational Grants and Resources” page is also worth a visit.

 

CMU RA copy3. Take advantage of free resources. While this one seems obvious, it’s not always obvious where to go for quality resources. STEM is a hot topic right now, which means there’s a lot to sort through on the internet. Here are just a few of the free resources we like:

There are a lot of great webinars, blogs, and forums as well. For example, you can check out our Back-to-School Webinar Series or join the discussion on our forums.

 

4. Invest in training. Investing in the right training will help you get the most out of your STEM classroom. Because STEM requires students to take a more active role in their learning process, look for training programs that provide practical, hands-on experience to help you manage your STEM classroom and maximize your resources.

By partnering with Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy, Robomatter is able to offer a full line of training for STEM robotics teachers. Click here to learn more about online and onsite training for VEX and LEGO platforms.

 

Uncomplicate 25. Take advantage of contests and giveaways. You’d be surprised at how easy it is to get free stuff. There are lots of organizations who want to help STEM teachers and students. Take a look at these sites for some ideas:

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

August 25th, 2015 at 6:30 am

Uncomplicate Your Classroom with Robot Virtual Worlds!

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Teach Faster Flexible

You’ve probably heard of Robot Virtual Worlds, a high-end simulation environment that enables students to learn programming, even if they don’t have direct access to a physical robot. But what are the benefits of Robot Virtual Worlds and how can you use it in your classroom?

Robot Virtual Worlds is a great tool for you, your students, and your classroom. Our infographic shows just a few of the ways Robot Virtual Worlds can help you uncomplicate your classroom by:

  • Helping you teach more efficiently with fewer resources
  • Lowering the cost of staring a robotics classroom
  • Managing students working at different levels
  • Keeping students engaged
  • Capturing authentic assessment and tracking individual student progress

 

 
Robot Virtual Worlds is not designed to replace your physical robots. Instead, it’s designed to help you enhance what you’re already doing in your classroom, and help you teach faster and more efficiently with fewer resources. Looking for ideas on how you can use Robot Virtual Worlds in your classroom? Here are just a few:

  • Have students use Robot Virtual Worlds to test their code before working with a physical robot
  • Use Robot Virtual Worlds to assign robotics homework
  • Use Robot Virtual Worlds to create your own virtual challenges
  • Use simulated fantasy worlds to capture students’ attention and make learning fun
  • Provide a virtual environment for robotics teams to learn to program

You can also check out these real-world stories from teachers who have used Robot Virtual Worlds in their classroom:

Palisades Middle School

Read about how Palisades Middle School is using Robot Virtual Worlds to teach 8th grade students how to build and program a robot through collaborative teamwork

Hopewell Area School District

Learn how a teacher in the Hopewell Area School District used Robot Virtual Worlds to challenge students to apply the basics of ROBOTC programming while also asking them to come up with unique strategies for solving an open-ended challenge
 

Want to learn more about using Robot Virtual Worlds in your classroom? Tune into our “Using Robot Virtual Worlds in the PLTW Classroom” webinar on Wednesday, September 9th at 7:00 pm EDT.

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

August 12th, 2015 at 9:28 pm

PLTW Teachers – Uncomplicate your Classroom!

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PLTW Twitter

Robomatter is pleased to support Project Lead The Way (PLTW) schools and teachers! We want you to make the most of your school year with the PLTW Upgrade Pack.

Learn More!

The PLTW Upgrade Pack Includes:

 

RVW Video Player

Robot Virtual Worlds

Designed to enhance your physical robot classroom, Robot Virtual Worlds is a high-end simulation environment that enables students to learn programming without a physical robot.

 

 

 

 

ROBOTC Graphical

ROBOTC Graphical Interface

ROBOTC Graphical uses the same Natural Language commands you’re used to, but with an easy-to-use, drag-and-drop interface.

 

 

 

 

VEX IQ

Program VEX CORTEX and VEX IQ Robots with One Language

With the PLTW Upgrade Pack, you can program both VEX CORTEX and VEX IQ robots using the same ROBOTC programming language!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want access to Robot Virtual Worlds, ROBOTC Graphical, and VEX IQ Programming?

Upgrade Your PLTW Classroom today, for only $249!

 

The upgrade includes access for 100 seats for the entire school year.

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

August 5th, 2015 at 7:00 am