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ROBOTC for LEGO MINDSTORMS 4.32 Available Today!

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ROBOTC 4-32 LEGO
 

The ROBOTC Development Team is excited to announce our latest update, ROBOTC 4.32! This update is for the LEGO MINDSTORMS (NXT and EV3) robotics systems and includes new features, functionality and a load of bug fixes.

Click here to download 4.32!

Important Setup Information for ROBOTC 4.32:

LEGO NXT Users:

  • Simply update to the latest ROBOTC firmware from inside of ROBOTC.

LEGO EV3 Users:

  • All users will need to update the  LEGO EV3′s Kernel by connecting the EV3 and selecting “Robot Menu -> Download EV3 Linux Kernel” from inside of ROBOTC. The version number (1.07X) is the same to keep alignment with the EV3 Programming Software and LEGO’s releases.
  • After updating your EV3′s Linux Kernel, you’ll also need to update the ROBOTC firmware from inside of ROBOTC.

ROBOTC 4.30 —> 4.32 Change Log:

Robot Virtual Worlds Package Manager

Robot Virtual Worlds Package Manager simplifies keeping your RVW worlds up-to-date and allows you to easily download new ones.

RBC Macro Editor

The RBC Macro Editor allows you to quickly create a ROBOTC Text-Based or Graphical macro file that will pre-configure many aspects of the UI, such as platform, the debugger windows that are to be opened, the default save-as file name and many others. If you are targeting Virtual Worlds, you can also select which world should be used.

General Changes

  • Debug Stream has been made more robust to prevent buffer overflows and corrupted data.
  • Added quick access, “Add License” menu item.
  • Added command line option to deactivate all active, non-building licenses (-DEACTIVATE).
  • “SensorValue” intrinsic definition changed from ‘word’ to ‘int’. This will allow it be be either ‘short’ or ‘long’ depending on the native “int” format of specific platform.
  • CTRL+ALT+SHIFT+D” is new keyboard accelerator to open preferences.
  • All libraries (DLLs) and executables (EXEs) are now signed.

General Bug Fixes

  • Fix issue where a “save as” with a new document -> then a subsequent “save” would cause a “save as” prompt in the wrong location.
  • Fix enumeration bug in Joystick Driver
  • Context menu for large ICON toolbar changes now take immediate effect.
  • Fix the repeatUntil(0) warning message to say “‘repeat until’ expression is constant ‘0’. Loop will never exit.”
  • Fix issue with command line deactivation with building licenses
  • IDE was not removing error flags from graphical blocks.
  • Long operands on opcodes “&” “|”, “^” and “~” were incorrectly handling negative 16-bit constants.
  • Fix bug in addTo/MinusTo/DivideTo/TimesTo opcode when variable is a global short variable and the operand is a 16-bit or less compile time constant.
  • Fix issue that prevented functions that return pointers to be dereferenced in an expression.
  • Fixed a bug where the missing “Name” field would cause a crash for the command line activation.

Graphical

  • Hitting the Control key no longer deselects all the things.
  • Bug causing Graphical Block artefacts on the screen has been fixed.

MINDSTORMS

  • New Linux image, updated to 1.07X to ensure compatibility with LEGO EV3 Programming Software. Please be sure to update your brick to the latest Linux firmware.
  • EV3 brick can now be renamed from both the file and the communication utilities in the Robot menu.
  • Refreshed the Driver Suite files for both NXT and EV3
  • getColorRGB() will now also work with a standard LEGO NXT Color sensor.
  • Added intrinsic getSensorConnType() to retrieve sensor connection type.
  • Fixed multi-tasking issue in EV3 VM where multi-tasking was not possible with programs started directly from the EV3 Brick.
  • Fixed a division by zero error in DatalogTest.c sample program
  • Fixed an issue where uploading a file from your EV3 to your PC removed the file extension from the uploaded file.
  • LEGO NXT Sensors that are normally auto-ID’d no longer have their autoID flag disabled for that port.
  • LEGO Energy Meter was improperly configured.
  • Fix Standard Model issue for EV3 (Gyro was improperly configured)

Happy Programming!

Written by Cara Friez

June 12th, 2015 at 5:29 pm

The Robotics Summer of Learning is Back!

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SOL Coming Soon

We are proud to announce the return of our Robotics Summer of Learning program! This summer, students have the opportunity to learn how to program robots, earn a programming certificate and badges, and play with cool software for FREE! We will provide all of the software and training materials at no cost to you or your students.  The course will consist of three modules: movement, sensing, and program flow and will be taught using the Robot Virtual World software.

The Robotics Summer of Learning starts June 15th, register here and we’ll send you a reminder when it opens up!

VEX Users: Program Virtual Robots Without Downloading Anything New!

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Have You Explored New Worlds with ROBOTC?

ROBOTC has provided you with many challenges and learning opportunities, but did you know you can explore exciting new virtual worlds without downloading anything new? Try out Robot Virtual Worlds for FREE in ROBOTC with a 10-day trial!

See the instructions to get started at the bottom of this email!

What are Robot Virtual Worlds?

Robot Virtual Worlds are high-end simulation environments that enables users, without robots, to learn programming with game and competition worlds. Watch our video for more information!

Game Worlds!

Escape to one of our fantastic game worlds where you can use your programming skills to explore and complete challenges!

Ruins of Atlantis

We thought Atlantis was a myth. We were wrong. Your mission is to explore the Ruins of Atlantis, 6,000 meters below the surface of the ocean, collecting data and treasure as you do.

Palm Island Luau Edition

Visit the beautiful Palm Island and program your robot to drive along its boardwalk path. Collect coconut clusters and set lobster traps for the Luau.

Operation Reset

The mining colony of Alpha Base H99 needs your help! A terrible storm has damaged the colony’s equipment and we need you to use your programming skills to complete the mission.

Competition Worlds!

Practice your programming skills with virtual versions of popular robotic competitions.

VEX Nothing But Net

Try to get the most points by collecting and scoring the balls and bonus balls into the Low and High Goals. Elevate your robot into the climbing zone for bonus points!

VEX IQ Bank Shot

Get the highest score by emptying the ball cutouts, and scoring the balls into the scoring zone. More points if you can make a bank shot into the goal!

VEX Highrise Beltway

Autonomously score as many cubes as possible during the time period. Zoom around the beltway to move around. Beltway is a modified version of the VEX IQ Highrise competition game.

Getting Started

Starting your Virtual Worlds trial:

1.  Open ROBOTC (from the icon on your desktop or Start Menu).

2.  Click “Help”
in the menu and select “Manage Licenses”.


3.
  Click “Add License” in the menu and select “Robot Virtual Worlds – VEX” from the Product drop-down.

4.  Click “Start Trial”.

5.  Click “Close”.

Using Virtual Worlds:

1.  Click “Robot” in the menu and set the “Compiler Target” to “Virtual Worlds”.

2.  Click “Window” in the menu and set “Select a Virtual World to Use” to any of the virtual worlds installed.

Visit robotvirtualworlds.com to explore and download more levels!

If you need to go back to programming your physical robot, select “Physical Robot” from the “Compiler Target” menu.

Written by Cara Friez

June 9th, 2015 at 9:42 am

LEGO Users: Program Virtual Robots Without Downloading Anything New!

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Have You Explored New Worlds with ROBOTC?

ROBOTC has provided you with many challenges and learning opportunities, but did you know you can explore exciting new virtual worlds without downloading anything new? Try out Robot Virtual Worlds for FREE in ROBOTC with a 10-day trial!

See the instructions to get started at the bottom of this email!

What are Robot Virtual Worlds?

Robot Virtual Worlds are high-end simulation environments that enables users, without robots, to learn programming with game and competition worlds. Watch our video for more information!

Game Worlds!

Escape to one of our fantastic game worlds where you can use your programming skills to explore and complete challenges!

Ruins of Atlantis

We thought Atlantis was a myth. We were wrong. Your mission is to explore the Ruins of Atlantis, 6,000 meters below the surface of the ocean, collecting data and treasure as you do.

Palm Island Luau Edition

Visit the beautiful Palm Island and program your robot to drive along its boardwalk path. Collect coconut clusters and set lobster traps for the Luau.

Operation Reset

The mining colony of Alpha Base H99 needs your help! A terrible storm has damaged the colony’s equipment and we need you to use your programming skills to complete the mission.

Virtual Challenges!

Practice your programming skills with virtual versions of popular robotic competitions or challenging obstacle courses.

Curriculum Companion

Practice valuable programming concepts with a variety of activities using the curriculum companion. Use the same ROBOTC code to program your real and virtual robots!

Level Builder

The RVW Level Builder provides a 12’x12′ square field to build on and several objects – from cans and boxes to line tracking tiles – that you can use to design challenging, unique, and fun levels!

Measurement Toolkit

Not sure how far to make your robot move? Use the virtual measurement tools to calculate the distance and angles needed to move around in the virtual worlds!

Getting Started

Starting your Virtual Worlds trial:

1.  Open ROBOTC (from the icon on your desktop or Start Menu).

2.  Click “Help”
in the menu and select “Manage Licenses”.

3.  Click “Add License” in the menu and select “Robot Virtual Worlds – LEGO” from the Product drop-down.


4.
  Click “Start Trial”.

5.  Click “Close”.


Using Virtual Worlds:

1.  Click “Robot” in the menu and set the “Compiler Target” to “Virtual Worlds”.

2.  Click “Window” in the menu and set “Select a Virtual World to Use” to any of the virtual worlds installed.

Visit robotvirtualworlds.com to explore and download more levels!

If you need to go back to programming your physical robot, select “Physical Robot” from the “Compiler Target” menu.

 

Written by Cara Friez

June 9th, 2015 at 9:41 am

Do you have a Cool ROBOTC Project??

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Cool Projects 2

The end of the school year is here and to celebrate, we’d love to showcase some of the ROBOTC projects and code you’ve been working on all year long! If you have a cool project (like these!) send us an email at socialmedia@robomatter.com with a description and your code, pictures, and/or videos. We’ll share it on our blog in an upcoming post!

Written by Cara Friez

June 4th, 2015 at 6:00 am

2015 Robomatter Scholarship Winner

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The Robotics Education and Competition (REC) Foundation isRobomatter-Logo pleased to announce the winner of the 2015 Robomatter Scholarship, valued at $5,000 which invited students participating in the VEX Robotics Competition to submit an essay explaining how their participation in both the VEX Robotics Competition and the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy sponsored Robot Virtual World Competition enhanced their understanding and application of programming. In addition, students were encouraged to share how programing skills and use of ROBOTC improved their robotics experience.

“It’s rewarding to hear that students, like Max Farr, gain valuable hands-on experience in programming through participation in the VEX Robotics Competition,” said Jason Morrella, president of the REC Foundation. “The REC Foundation is extremely grateful to partners, such as Robomatter, who make it possible for students to secure the resources they need to continue their education and pursue a post-secondary degree in STEM.”

The winner of the 2015 Robomatter Scholarship is: Max Farr, VEX Robotics Competition Team 21, from CHAMPS Charter High School in California.

“As our team’s driver and programmer, I rely on ROBOTC’s easy and approachable format to enable me to quickly plan, set up and execute commands that improve our game strategy and overall execution,” said Max Farr. “I also rely on Robomatter’s Virtual World at the beginning of every season to better understand the game and quickly begin brainstorming robot designs.”

The 2015/2016 season is now open with VEX IQ Challenge Bank Shot and VEX Robotics Competition Nothing But Net. Both games are available through the Robot Virtual Worlds too!

For more information about the REC Foundation and the scholarship program, please visit www.RoboticsEducation.org. And for more information about Robomatter, please visit www.Robomatter.com.

Written by Cara Friez

June 4th, 2015 at 5:30 am

Summer Teacher Trainings are Filling Up Quickly!

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ban_eduProDev
 

Our on-site (in Pittsburgh, PA) and online Summer Professional Development classes for VEX CORTEX, VEX IQ, and LEGO MINDSTORMS are filling up quickly. Register today to make sure you get into your preferred course (listed below!)

Highlights of the Robotics Academy Training:

  • Acquire new skills with technology and new ways to teach STEM with robotics using innovative pedagogy!
  • No Prior Experience with Robotics or Programming required!
  • Hands-On Experience with 36 Contact Hours!
  • Learn directly from the curriculum and technology developers!

 

Here’s What People Are Saying After Our Trainings:

“You guys were fantastic! This was some of the most enjoyable and informative professional development I’ve ever attended. The instructor was incredibly knowledgeable and always willing to offer help when needed. I would recommend the Robotics Academy to any teacher that is wanting to get into robotics education.”

“I thought that just about every aspect of the sessions was valuable. As a person coming in with an almost zero knowledge base, I left feeling I had a strong sense of how things work and how I can immediately implement things in my classroom.”

“Instructors were great … this stands as one of the most enjoyable workshops/courses I have taken in a VERY long time. I learned a lot, I had a good time, I was challenged … what course could hope for a better outcome than this.”

 

Find out more at CMU Robotics Academy Professional Development!

———————————————————————————————————–

VEX and VEX IQ

ban_vexTeacherTraining
On-Site Classes:

ROBOTC for VEX CORTEX
July 6 – 10, 2015
July 27 – 31, 2015

ROBOTC for VEX IQ
June 22 – 26, 2015
July 13 – 17, 2015

Online Classes:

ROBOTC Online Training for VEX CORTEX
June 22 – 26, 2015
Monday-Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EDT (12 – 3pm PDT)

ROBOTC Online Training for VEX IQ
Jul 6 – 10, 2015
Monday-Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EDT (12 – 3pm PDT)

———————————————————————————————————–

LEGO

ban_legoTeacherTraining
On-Site Classes:

ROBOTC for LEGO
June 29 – July 3, 2015
July 20- 24, 2015

Online Classes:

ROBOTC Online Training for LEGO
Jul 13 – 17, 2015
Monday-Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EDT (12 – 3pm PDT)

Written by Cara Friez

May 8th, 2015 at 5:30 am

A Teacher’s POV: International School Manila

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The Robot-arm mimics a real arm's motion

The Robot-arm mimics a real arm’s motion

My name is Ringo Dingrando and I teach Robotics and Physics at International School Manila in the Philippines.  For the past three years, high school students have been inquiring into how to program using ROBOTC and how to use their programming skills to build robots, often with VEX hardware.  In the classroom, most of my students learn the basics through some great online tutorial videos and by teaching each other.  They can then try their code out on virtual robots by using Robot Virtual Worlds software.  This code is then modified and put onto a physical robot that they build themselves.

Students were enthralled to see the 3D printer in action.

Students were enthralled to see the 3D printer in action.

This has led to quick progress in the classroom, but it is in our after-school Robotics Club where the benefits of this are becoming more visible. Students in the club needed a venue to showcase their creative robots, and so we developed Robolution.  This is a daylong event in which ISM students in elementary, middle, and high school are given the opportunity to showcase the creations they have been working on in the previous month.

 


 

We recently completed our second annual Robolution and the results were spectacular.  Some of the highlights included a life-size robot arm controlled in “Iron Man” style, an air-powered pong game, and a ping-pong launching device.  (Check out the video links!)  Design Tech students were wowing the audience by demonstrating the capabilities of one of our 3D printers.  Students in the middle school robotics program showed off their Lego Mindstorm robots with highlights such as a Rubik’s Cube solver, a spinner factory, and a stair-climber.  Elementary school students taught letters and numbers via Bee Bots and showcased their programming prowess through interactive Scratch games.


 

Robolution was a fantastic learning experience because it promoted programming, design thinking, and creativity.  Almost a thousand people in the ISM community were exposed to the awesomeness of robotics.  I fully expect that a year from now I’ll be sharing even more amazing results from our 3rd Annual Robolution.

 

Written by Cara Friez

April 30th, 2015 at 9:55 am

VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual Worlds Available!

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The Robot Virtual Worlds team is thrilled to announce the availability of two brand new virtual environments, the VEX Robotics Competition – Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Challenge – Bank Shot Robot Virtual Worlds. As in years past, these worlds were made available at the same time as their real world counterparts were unveiled at VEX Worlds!

The competitions for this year are both extremely exciting; teams will actually need to shoot balls into goals. The purpose of these virtual environments is to provide teams with an environment that allows for some strategic planning, and to act as a platform to start programming with the same kinds of motors and sensors that are available in the real world. To that end, we’ve added exciting new “Launchbots” that are capable of shooting balls across the field and are fully programmable with a full array of motors and sensors. One feature we’re really excited about is the “trajectory line”, which shows exactly where your shot will go based on the robots angle and motor power! Game scoring, timing, pre-loads, match loads, climbing, and other elements are all implemented, too.

Launchbot shooting a ball into the red net:

Nothing But Net

Check out our video of the VEX Robotics Competition – Nothing But Net RVW in action:

Launchbot IQ aiming a shot into the common goal:

Bank Shot

And here is footage from the VEX IQ Challenge – Bank Shot RVW:

To help you get started with these new Robot Virtual Worlds, we are providing a FREE summer license, available at: http://robotc.net/vex/. Our video-based VEX IQ Curriculum is also available completely for free to help you get started with programming.

Click here for more information on the VEX Robotics Competition – Nothing But Net Robot Virtual World, and here for the VEX IQ Challenge – Bank Shot Robot Virtual World.

Written by Jesse Flot

April 24th, 2015 at 10:05 am

A Teacher’s POV: Palisades Middle School Robotics Initiative

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Palisades1

Training at Carnegie Robotics Academy

After last summer’s on-site training at Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy, Palisades Middle School’s technology and computer teachers initiated semester STEM units featuring the VEX Cortex Clawbot, Robot Virtual Worlds software, and ROBOTC programming. 8th grade students now experience how to build and program a robot through collaborative teamwork.

In technology class groups of students learn about robotic systems and mechanics by building and remotely controlling a VEX Clawbot. In computer class students program the VEX Cortex Clawbot in a virtual, immersive environment using Robot Virtual Worlds software and through coursework provided by Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy’s CS2N Moodle-based learning management system. By combining their knowledge and skills in groups, students will ultimately compete using autonomous and remote-control programming in a class competition called, “Tic Tech Toe”.

Palisades2

Julia, 8th grade middle school student

I attend Palisades Middle School and am in the 8th grade. I love how both our computer and technology class are combined. Being brand new to the whole experience of robotics, finding new ways to use technology educationally is something that really intrigues me. Currently I am in computer class and cannot compare it to anything else. Overall, the atmosphere and supportive people make this experience fun and worthwhile. It has introduced me to concepts that I didn’t even know were possible and are very educational. For example, I have recently learned to use a very cool program called ROBOTC. Basically, ROBOTC is a program which allows you to give your robot “tasks”. In my computer class we have been doing this quite a bit and I just love everything about it. Its a new and educational way for students to learn programming. My learning this at a young age really builds success for the future.

Lydia, 8th grade middle school student

Student-Created Simulated Field  Created in RVW Level Builder

Student-Created Simulated Field
Created in RVW Level Builder

Our technology and computer classes joined together while working on robotics. I really enjoyed being able to create and program robots. In our tech class each student was assigned a partner to build a robot and race it in a competition against fellow classmates. Our computer class involved robotic programming.We learned how to compile and download programs to a virtual robot and complete different challenges. This program was so much fun and I really enjoyed how we got to experience both “hands-on” and “hands-off” learning.

Making Robotics Real for Students

There is a real advantage in learning how to program in a virtual environment. Most programming courses offer 2-dimensional “Hello World” feedback. Robot Virtual Worlds gives students immediate 3-D feedback and opens their eyes to real-world programming applications. We have been pleasantly surprised with how students respond with interest to learning how to program when it’s presented in this context.

Robot Virtual Worlds also offers an engaging method of project-oriented learning involving challenges. Students don’t just program the robot to move, they learn what it would be like to manipulate a robot through various simulated environments. These environments called “worlds” could be a space mission, tropical island, or could even be student-designed obstacle field. These worlds have been effective in stimulating interest and maintaining learner engagement.

Palisades4In addition to the classroom experience, our first semester students also visited a local robotics company and learned first-hand how their robotics experiences have real-world relevance. Students were given the opportunity to see actual robots in development and other related technologies. This visit got the student’s attention, providing them with a better understanding of potential opportunities in engineering and programming.

We are anxious to continue this collaborative program. There was an initial investment in training, software, and hardware, but we feel that the return for the students is well worth it. In sharing our classes and resources, students are learning about information and machine technology in a unique way. We hope that this transfers over into their continuing studies and even future careers.