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Getting Started with ROBOTC Graphical for EV3!

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EV3 ROBOTCAre you interested in learning how to program in ROBOTC Graphical for LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 or EV3 Robot Virtual Worlds? If so, then this YouTube playlist is for you! This set of videos will help you to get started programming with ROBOTC.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

These videos are part of the Introduction to Programming EV3 Curriculum. To continue further with our free online training, visit our curriculum page here! http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu/previews/ev3_products/robotc_ev3_curriculum/

Written by Cara Friez

March 20th, 2015 at 6:30 am

A Teacher’s POV: RVW VEX IQ Beltway

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Beltway2Jason McKenna, from the Hopewell Area School District outside of Pittsburgh, PA, writes about his experience in the classroom with the new Robot Virtual World game, VEX IQ Beltway. Check it out below …

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The new VEX IQ virtual game Beltway is a great way to challenge your students to apply the basics of ROBOTC programming while also asking them to come up with unique strategies to try to score as many points in the 2 minute game as possible. My students just spent about 3 weeks working on the challenge and trying to score the highest score as possible. The students had an absolute blast and as a teacher, it was great seeing all the different ways the students tried to tackle this completely open-ended challenge.

Beltway4The objective in Beltway is the same as VEX IQ Highrise: program your VEX IQ robot to autonomously score as many cubes as possible during a 2 minute period. With Beltway, a conveyor belt has been added around the perimeter of the game field in order to assist with game play. Additionally, the virtual environment utilizes “magic stacking” meaning that the cubes automatically jump onto the stack when they are placed onto of the stacking cube regardless of the apparent size of the robot. The conveyor belt reduces the accumulation of error, where, for example, a robot’s slight error in one turn becomes a larger error when the robot repeats that same turn 4 or 5 times. Any time students attempt a long program with many different elements they will at some point become frustrated with the accumulation of error that occurs. Magic stacking and the large margin of error that enables easy pickup of cubes eliminates any frustration that the students may encounter as try to pick up cubes and then stack them. These elements of gameplay in Beltway allow students to focus on their strategy, and it also allows them to try to experiment with many different scoring methods because they are not spending a lot of time programming perfect 90 degree turns and aligning their robots perfectly to pick up a cube. You can click here for a more extensive list of rules and information about gameplay!

Beltway1Beltway comes with a variety of sample programs that students can use to help them get started or as a reference as they adjust their strategies. For example, if students decided that they wanted to control the conveyer belt manually, they could refer to a sample program to see how that is done. I did that many times while monitoring the students. After a few days, the students aren’t repeatedly raising their hands; instead, they just refer to the sample programs for guidance.

The game also served as a great tool to teach beginning programmers the utility of comments. Oftentimes, beginners don’t make programs quite as long as the ones they will make for Beltway. Students quickly saw the need to point out what was going on in their code with comments so they could go back to those sections and make whatever adjustments they wanted as they progressed with their gameplay.

As I stated earlier, my students had a lot of fun while playing Beltway. It is not easy to keep students’ interest level high in an activity that takes 3 weeks. The students maintained their level of interest and they consistently asked to stay after school to work on their programs some more. We had an in-class competition where the students ran their final programs. The winning team scored the winning points as the timer, literally, went to zero. It was pandemonium in my room. Kids were high-fiving each other, cheering, and remarking at how awesome the competition turned out. Students were also talking about the different strategies that the other teams used and how they could change their programs based upon what they had just seen.

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So now, of course, the students want to play some more. This is great because now I can use that as an opportunity to show students how they can take some of the code that they used over and over again (for example, picking up cubes) and show them how they can use full ROBOTC to turn those behaviors into functions. Beltway has proven to be both a great teaching and learning tool in my classroom.

Click here to download the game!

- Jason McKenna

Tons of Robot Virtual Worlds Updates Available Today!

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RVWThe Robot Virtual World team is happy to announce our latest updates are available for Ruins of Atlantis, Palm Island, and Operation Reset! We’ve included updated sample program to support all platform types (VEX CORTEX, VEX IQ, EV3, and NXT) within ROBOTC. You can also choose what type of sample program you would like to use from Graphical, Natural Language, or Standard.

Thanks again to everyone who has provided feedback! Please continue to do so at the ROBOTC.net Forums. Happy programming!

 

 

 

Written by Cara Friez

February 17th, 2015 at 8:10 am

BotBench: Using Robot Virtual Worlds inside a VM

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Xander over at BotBench goes into detail in a new blog post about using Robot Virtual Worlds (RVW) inside a Virtual Machine.

He talks about how some of the issues you might encounter using a VM and some of the solutions he has found. Such as the 3 camera settings in RVW:

1. Follow mode: you can use the wheel to zoom in and out.
2. Camera view from above
3. Free movement: hold left button and move to move the view. The wheel is used for zooming.

Unfortunately, if you run RVW inside a VM, camera option 3 does not work. Unless, of course, you know how to configure VMware Workstation properly. To find out how to configure properly and to read the full article, click here!

Written by Cara Friez

January 15th, 2015 at 11:11 am

New Robot Virtual Worlds iPad App Available!

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We are thrilled to announce a brand new, FREE Robot Virtual Worlds app for the iPad! The Robot Virtual Worlds app allows you to start learning how to program both simulated VEX IQ and fantasy robots using ROBOTC Graphical.

Click here to to open the Robot Virtual Worlds App in iTunes!

The current version of the app will allow you to use the Basic Movement commands from ROBOTC Graphical to control the robot (forward, backward, turn right, turn left), along with the robot’s grippers and arms to interact with objects in the environment. We believe this is a great teaching tool to include with the Expedition Atlantis iPad app as well as a teaching tool for ROBOTC Graphical!

Check out our video of the app in action…


 
And as always, if you have questions or feedback, feel free to contact at support@robotc.net or visit our forums! Happy programming!!

Written by Jesse Flot

December 9th, 2014 at 6:45 am

VEX IQ Highrise/Beltway RVW 2.60 Update!

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Just in time for Thanksgiving break, we’re releasing an update to our VEX IQ Highrise and Beltway Robot Virtual World! Thank you to everyone who has been participating and giving feedback so far! (Note that the Beltway game is part of the VEX IQ Highrise RVW Download.)

We’ve implemented tons of new features based on your feedback. Some of the highlights:

  • There are two new modes for playing Beltway, a 5 minute competition mode, and an unlimited mode for those of you who would like to get the highest possible score
  • You can now switch robots and starting points while playing the game, allowing for greater variety in programming solutions.