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FREE Summer of Learning ROBOTC Online Classes Start on Monday!

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Live TrainingStarting Monday, June 17th, our free online classes will begin for the Robotics Summer of Learning. The ROBOTC team will show you the best ways to get started using ROBOTC and answer your questions LIVE! The goals for these classes is to support you, our users, and help you earn a ROBOTC certification!

The classes and Q&A sessions will take place throughout the summer on WebEx at the times listed below. The length of the class will be based on how many questions we need to answer.

 
 

VEX
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 11:00am EDT
 
LEGO
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 12:00pm EDT

**Classes will be recorded and posted online after each session.**

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How to Sign Up:

1. Register for Summer of Learning - Choose one of the following Robotics Summer of Learning Courses and sign up!

LEGO Icon 3VEX Icon 3 copy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Choose a WebEx Course - Join your choice of WebEx courses 30 minutes before scheduled course begins:

VEX
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 11:00am EDT

LEGO
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays at 12:00pm EDT

If you would like to ask questions during the live class, make sure to have a USB headset. You can also submit your questions before and during each class through the ROBOTC forum or our social media sites.

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Official RSOL Prizes Announced! 

Robotics Prize
Don’t forget, you can win some great prizes if you compete in one of our ROBOTC Robot Virtual Worlds Challenges! We will be giving away VEX IQ and NXT Kits; ROBOTC and Robot Virtual Worlds licenses; and two $1000 scholarships.
Sign-up Today!

Prizes for the Robotics Summer of Learning Announced!

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Robotics PrizeWe are very happy to announce the official prizes for the Robotics Summer of Learning competitions! We will be giving away VEX IQ and NXT Kits; ROBOTC and Robot Virtual Worlds licenses; and two $1000 scholarships. There will be three competitions eligible for prizes: CS2N VEX Toss Up Challenge, CS2N FTC “Ring It Up!” Challenge, and Robot Virtual Worlds Beacons and Barriers.

Each competition will be broken up into three divisions. Each player is eligible for only one prize per competition. The official rules are listed on the official Robotics Summer of Learning page.

Competitions are open now, so sign up today!
 

 

Divisions

  • Middle School Division – 6th to 8th Grade (for the 2013-2014 School Year)
  • High School Division - 9th to 12th Grade (for the 2013-2014 School Year)
  • Open Division - Teachers, Mentors, Coaches, Educators, Hobbyists, Everyone!

 
Prizes

VEX Prizes FTC PrizesLevel Builder Prizes

The official rules are listed on the official Robotics Summer of Learning page.

Start programming today for your chance at these awesome prizes!
 

Robot designed by Drew Ellis from The Noun Project and the Trophy is from The Noun Project.

 

TETRIX Curiosity Rover Programmed with ROBOTC

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IMG_1712We ran into Paul Utley from Pitsco at the 2013 FIRST Championship who designed a model of the Curiosity Rover with TETRIX parts, NXT brick, and programmed in ROBOTC! We were lucky enough to get a short interview with him about it. Check it out here …
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
If you are at the 2013 FIRST Championship in St. Louis, MO., make sure to stop by and check it out in person. For more information on Tetrix go to http://www.tetrixrobotics.com
 

Written by Cara Friez

April 25th, 2013 at 6:22 pm

NXT ‘Coltar’ Blends Art, Science

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In years past, the science and art fields were generally considered to be diametrically opposed; if something was scientific it usually didn’t have artistic value, and if it was a work of art it probably didn’t do much for the scientific community. Recently, though, the line between art and science has been blurred and blended in some very unique and interesting ways.

A prime example of this is a color-sensing “Coltar” made by Youtube user PhilippLens. By mixing imagination with ingenuity, PhilippLens created the hybrid guitar using a LEGO Mindstorms NXT brick with a color sensor and two touch sensors (one on the Coltar itself, the other on the ‘pick’). Using the touch sensors to control chords and the color sensor to control which notes are being ‘strummed’ allows the Coltar to emit a surprisingly large range of notes.


YouTube Direct Link 

For more information on this cool project, check out Philipp’s Reddit post. You can also download the code here.

Written by John Watson

August 20th, 2012 at 12:19 pm

New NXT X-Y Plotter ‘Draws’ Attention

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The NXT X-Y axis plotter showcasing some simple shapes it drew.

When you think of a printer, what images come to mind? Generally, printers are considered necessary but frustrating (Office Space, anyone?) pieces of office equipment and like most other cubicle furnishings they are usually pretty boring.

Not so much anymore.

McNamara has yet again created something functional yet stylish, this time by turning an NXT and some Mindstorm parts into a surprisingly accurate X-Y axis plotter. Quite possibly the coolest thing about the plotter, though, is that (taken from McNamara’s blog) “An X–Y plotter is a plotter that operates in two axes of motion (“X” and “Y”)… The term was used to differentiate it from standard plotters which had control only of the “y” axis, the “x” axis being continuously fed to provide a plot of some variable with time.” This mean that the pen itself moves in both the X and Y directions (technically it moves in all 3 axis of motion, but the Z axis doesn’t come into play on this plotter, except to move the pen on and off the dry-erase board) and that the table stays in a static position; very cool.

Don’t take our word for it though; check it out on McNamara’s blog (complete with pictures, video, code, and building instructions)!

Written by John Watson

August 15th, 2012 at 8:52 am

Very cool Omniwheelchair

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2012-07-29-21.16.10

Simon Burfield, a.k.a. Burf has made a super cool model.  By model I mean chair and by chair I mean omnidirectional wheelchair. Oh and it’s life-sized, too.  Yeah, it is capable of handling no less than 90 kg!  I saw a video of an early prototype a few weeks ago but this new one is even better-er!

Some facts:

  • It uses 7 Mindstorms bricks. One for controlling and 6 that are used for moving.
  • Each driving NXT has two motors attached to it.  I presume that a third motor would probably be pushing it when it comes to providing current.  It’s not easy to push that much LEGO and human meat around.
  • The master NXT has 4 touch sensors connected (forward, back, left and right) and 2 motors to switch on the drive touch sensors.
  • It uses Rotacaster’s omniwheels to make it possible to move in any direction (except up, of course).
  • It is programmed in ROBOTC (of course)

Here’s one of the videos he made:


YouTube Direct Link 

Isn’t this awesome? Go check out the other pictures and videos on the original article page: [LINK]. [via BotBench]

Written by Xander Soldaat

August 1st, 2012 at 8:06 am

Michael’s Macro Mouse Project

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This project was submitted by ROBOTC user Michael B. He uses an NXT robot equipped with a HiTechnic EOPD (Electro Optical Proximity Detector) to determine the robots surroundings and then intelligently create and navigate a path through the maze maze.

From the creator:

It shows a robot solving a maze very similar to the micro mouse challenge. It’s an excellent application of 2D arrays. It’s also the most accessible task I could conceive of that would require students to build robots that remembered stuff about their surroundings, related that information and build on it, and then use that information to make intelligent decisions.

 

Here’s video of the Macro Mouse in action, with lots of additional detail:

Written by Jesse Flot

June 11th, 2012 at 9:36 am

Posted in Cool projects,NXT

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Bucket ‘o’ Bricks Brick Sorter

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NeXT-Generation, over on the ROBOTC forums, posted a very cool project he’s been working on for the last two months.  It’s an automated brick sorter made with a combination of Mindstorms NXT, Power Functions and Pneumatics.


YouTube Direct Link 

The video might be long but it’s well worth watching!

Naturally, we asked him questions about his creation:

What motivated you to make this?

I wanted to build a robot that was interactive and would entertain smaller kids, and be mechanically interesting to older ones, and even adults. Here’s what happened: I planned for it to be able to “learn” where the colors were supposed to go. You could tell it if it put the brick in the right or wrong area until it learned where they all belonged. But, mechanical glitches in the construction that I didn’t have time to fix prevented that from happening. I probably would have made another console with the other NXT with the yes/no buttons, and it could make sounds and use the display to interact.

How long did it take?

Well, if you count total time it’s been built, about two months. But, now here’s the catch: I’ve really only been working on it for about one month, because I got sick twice over the last two months, so in total I was out of it for about a month. During that month I was also working on other stuff. Probably about a week was lost to messing with my Boe-Bot and Pololu 3Pi.

Do you have any plans for future improvements or modifications?

I plan to revisit the same kind of concept, but with no deadline so that I can work out any problems that come up.

What is the average air speed of a laden swallow?

The average airspeed of a laden swallow is 42.

A very cool project, indeed!

Written by Xander Soldaat

April 30th, 2012 at 11:46 am

Posted in Cool projects

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Dexter Industries dGPS Sensor with Google Maps and ROBOTC

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Ever wanted to plot your path on a roadtrip or walk through the woods? Wanted to see where your robots went while you were asleep?

Dexter Industries has just made it super easy to do this and even more with ROBOTC using their dGPS sensor for the LEGO Mindstorms NXT!

The dGPS Sensor is $105.00 and is available from Dexter Industries.
Note: ROBOTC users can save 10% by typing in “robotcdgps” (without quotes)  in the coupon code area at checkout and receive 10% off the price of the dGPS until March 1st, 2011!

Using ROBOTC, the NXT and the dGPS sensor, you can download the included sample program program, drag it all over the earth, and then snap! open the file in Google Earth and see where you went.  In five easy steps:

  1. Download and send the sample program to your NXT.
  2. Attach the dGPS sensor to sensor port #1 and wait until it gets a signal.
  3. Start the program and proceed to wander around.
  4. Stop roaming. Connect your NXT back to your computer and using the NXT’s File Management dialog  (Robot – NXT Brick – File Management), download the file “Path.txt” to your desktop.
  5. Rename the file to “Path.kml”.  Double click the file to open with Google Earth and…  Voila.

Here’s a short video produced by the guys over at Dexter Industries showing off the cool new technology:

Written by Tim Friez

January 4th, 2011 at 4:51 pm

ROBOTC for Beginners

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We are working on making ROBOTC simpler and more beginner friendly! Here is our documentation for some new, simplified functions.  Each function can be used both with and without parameters!  (Everything is designed to work for the default REMBOT, but is customizable through parameters for more advanced users.)

Take a look and let us know what you think!

http://www.robotc.net/support/nxt/ROBOTC-for-Beginners/

NOTE: we have not yet released this version of ROBOTC to the public.

Written by bfeher

November 24th, 2010 at 4:04 pm

Posted in NXT

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