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Organizing a Robotics Classroom

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IMG_4201Getting your classroom organized for the beginning of the school year is an arduous task for even the most experienced teacher.  It can be even more demanding for those that teach robotics.  You’ve got the robot kits, you’ve been trained in ROBOTC, but how do you set up your class for the first day of school?  The goal of this article is to help answer the question for both new robotic teachers and teachers that have been teaching robotics for years.

As we all know, a robotics kit is more expensive than a textbook.  Moreover, because robotics kits contain so many small pieces, they can be much more difficult to take care of than a textbook.  As a result, keeping your kits organized is crucial.  If using a Lego Mindstorms or Tetrix robot, one way that I have found that can be very helpful is to name the NXT brick.  Then, give the same name to the kit. Now, assign the kit to the group of students in your class.  If the students know that over-tablethey are responsible for that kit, it goes a long way towards them acting more responsibly with the kit. If using a VEX robot, you won’t have the same ability to name your brick, but you can still able to label your robotics kit.

Which students are assigned to work together is also something that the teacher must put some thought into.  Once again, maintaining the kits is of the utmost importance.  Therefore, I am not going to allow students to work together if I feel that will not take care of the kit.  Some students are more organized and careful with the kits than others.  I always try to have one of those students in a group.  I try to have the kits named and assigned before the first day of school.  If I don’t know the students, then I may have to adjust the groups as we progress throughout the beginning of the school year.

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Once the kits are organized, the teacher can then start to think about how their curriculum items are going to be accessed and utilized.  A math teacher has a plan for when their students have a question about a topic, or when a student is confused about a particular concept.  A robotics teacher has to have the same type of plan in mind.  The beauty of teaching robotics lies in the fact that students are intrinsically motivated to find answers to their problems because they are highly engaged.  Some students will still be conditioned, however, to try to elicit the answer from the teacher instead of reasoning through a problem on their own.  Robotics teachers need to create a plan so the students can work towards being independent and productive problem solvers.

To that end, a good approach to a complex challenge is to examine what needs to be done before the challenge, during the challenge, and after the challenge is complete.  Before the challenge, students should be focusing on create flowcharts to organize their program and writing pseudocode to reflect those flowcharts.  During the challenge, students should focus on commenting their code and debugging techniques.  Afterwards, students should be afforded the opportunity to reflect and respond to what went well, what went not so well, and what they learned throughout the process.

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Giving students a little bit of structure while they engage a challenging task will go a long way towards ensuring that the students’ high level of engagement does not turn into a high level of frustration.  Engagement works both ways in that sense: High engagement leads to students that are focused on their task, but can also lead to high levels of frustration because the students desperately want to finish that task.  To avoid the frustration,teachers should provide a structure that the students can rely on when needed.  Before the school year begins, teachers should spend some time planning students’ work, and then the students can spend time during school working their plan.

The beginning of the school year is always a challenge.  As teachers, we understand that unforeseen difficulties will always arise.  However, going into the school year with as much planned and organized as possible helps us to focus on those unpredictable events that will undoubtedly occur.

Check out how we organize robot parts at the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy:


-Jason McKenna

Robotics Back to School Blog Series

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SCHOOL-BUS-DRIVERIt is that time of year again … backpacks on our backs, buses on the streets, and lessons being planned. Yes, we are going back to school! To kick start the school year, we are introducing a six week robotics back to school blog series that highlights the technical and pedagogical side of planning for your robotics classroom. John Watson, from ROBOTC customer support, and Jason McKenna, a K-8 Gifted Support Teacher in the Hopewell Area School District outside of Pittsburgh, PA, will be sharing with you tips, tricks, advice, and recommendations on prepping your robotics classroom and curriculum.

As each blog is posted, the topics below will turn into hyperlinks, so feel free to bookmark this page!

Topics

If you have any questions or would like to start a conversation on any of the topics, feel free to leave us a comment below!

Sneak Preview: RVW Expedition Atlantis

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Atlantis01Happy Friday! I thought it might be nice to end the week with a little sneak preview into our newest Robot Virtual World game, “Expedition Atlantis: A Calculated Deep Sea Adventure.” We are still working on it, so things might change, but wanted to share an inside look. The game and curriculum will be available this Fall. Check back for more info soon!

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Written by Cara Friez

July 12th, 2013 at 5:59 pm

Controlling Pneumatic Actuators in ROBOTC

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Pneumatic Actuators translate the force of compressed air into fast and powerful motion. In the VEX Robotics System, all pneumatic actuators create linear (in-and-out) motion, although rotary actuators do exist. The compressed air that powers the actuators is stored in a reservoir tank; differences in air pressure between the actuators and tank cause the actuators to move in and out.

The flow of air between the tank and the actuators (directly related to the differences in air pressure)  is controlled by a small switch, called an electromagnetic solenoid, which connects to the VEX PIC or Cortex using a standard 3-pin wire. It’s a common misconception that, since the solenoid enables motion, its 3-pin wire should plug into one of the MOTOR ports on the microcontroller. Actually, a solenoid is what’s considered a “Digital Output”, and should be plugged into one of the DIGITAL ports on the Cortex, or ANALOG/DIGITAL ports on the PIC.

To configure the solenoid in ROBOTC, go to the Motors and Sensors Setup menu, and select “Digital Out” as the sensor type.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then, in ROBOTC, when you want to activate the pneumatic actuator controlled by the solenoid, you set its value equal to “1″. To deactivate it, set its value equal to “0″. In the sample code below, the remote control buttons are used to activate and deactivate the pneumatic actuator.

#pragma config(Sensor, dgtl7,  solenoid,            sensorDigitalOut)
//*!!Code automatically generated by ‘ROBOTC’ configuration wizard               !!*//

task main()
{
while(true)                   // Loop Forever
{
if(vexRT[Btn6U] == 1)           // If button 6U (upper right shoulder button) is pressed:
{
SensorValue[solenoid] = 1;  // …activate the solenoid.
}
else // If button 6U (upper right shoulder button) is  NOT pressed:
{
SensorValue[solenoid] = 0;  // ..deactivate the solenoid.
}
}
}

For more information on using pneumatic actuators, check out our Pneumatics lesson from the VEX 2.0 Curriculum.

Written by Jesse Flot

November 11th, 2010 at 4:12 pm

Traversing a Grand Challenge with the VEX Cortex

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The Grand Challenge is a staff designed course which is not revealed to participants until the day of the competition. Before the competition, participants are provided with a list of conditions and situations to prepare their robots for.

On the day of the competition, the participant’s programming knowledge and preparation are put to the test as they work to traverse the course in a limited amount of time. The robot that makes the most progress without stalling out or deviating from the course wins!

In this iteration of the Grand Challenge, the Cortex-based robot must:

  • Navigate an obstructed path using feedback from the Shaft Encoders and Ultrasonic Rangefinder
  • Track an incomplete line up and down a ramp using feedback from the Line Tracking sensors
  • (Optional) Pick up the yellow ball and take it to the finish zone for extra points
  • Respond to remote-control commands only in the final zone
  • Avoid hitting obstacles in it’s path, walls on the field, and falling from the ramp

Check out this cool video of the robot completing the course.

To accomplish it’s task, the Cortex-based robot is equipped with:

  • Two driving motors, each with a Shaft Encoder
  • An Omni-wheel acting as a rear-caster wheel
  • Three Line Tracking Sensors
  • An Ultrasonic Rangefinder
  • Remote Control over VEXnet

Instructions for building this robot can be found here.

If you’d like ideas for creating your own Grand Challenge, check out this document for some inspiration.

Note: All materials are part of the VEX Cortex Video Trainer. Check it Out!

Written by Jesse Flot

November 3rd, 2010 at 10:40 am

Robot Magazine Article: VEX Curriculum 2.0

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VEX Curriculum 2.0 SleveCheck out the VEX Curriculum 2.0 review, featured in ROBOT Magazine! Here’s an excerpt from the article:

“When I began clicking around the VEX Curriculum I was immediately impressed by both the scope and the quality of the materials. Whether you are a student, teacher, or a hobbyist eager to learn more about robotics you will find something there for you. At www.vexcurriculum.com I found a cornucopia of practical robotics exercises and presentations that are shown in user-friendly, inviting multi-media formats. The Curriculum is designed to meet academic standards for high school classes, but any curious person interested in robotics will enjoy perusing the site. Although the package is intended to sustain two semesters of study, it is voluminous. The teachers that I spoke to also use segments of the curriculum for multi-year robotics programs, to guide students through independent study robotics projects, and as a robotics library for students building robot projects.

Teachers that use the Carnegie Mellon Curriculum report that the lessons tend to build confidence and they make the users feel associated with Carnegie Mellon. In researching this article, I found that both educators and students express a sense of pride as they work through the materials, and in the process, succeed in learning to solve robotics problems and meet multidisciplinary intellectual challenges.”

Read the entire article here: http://www.botmag.com/articles/vexcurriculum.shtml

Preview the VEX Curriclum 2.0 here: http://www.education.rec.ri.cmu.edu/roboticscurriculum/vex_online/main_start.htm

Written by Jesse Flot

December 16th, 2009 at 10:19 am