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VEX IQ Challenge Ringmaster Robot Virtual World Now Available!

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RVW Ringmaster
 

We are thrilled to announce the availability of our brand new virtual environment, the VEX IQ Challenge Ringmaster! As in years past, this world is made available at the same time as its real world counterpart when unveiled at VEX Worlds!

The competition for this year is extremely exciting! With VEX IQ Challenge Ringmaster, matches are played on a field set up as seen below. The object of the game is to attain the highest score by Scoring Rings on the Floor Goal and on Posts, by having Uniform Posts, by Emptying Starting Pegs, and by Releasing the Bonus Tray.

 

 

Using Robot Virtual Worlds will allow you to …

  • Practice programming in the 2017-2018 game right away
  • Compete with your classmates, or online (starting in the Fall)
  • Form strategies using the virtual field
  • Develop and test code on a simulated robot before running code on a real robot!

To help you get started with this new Robot Virtual World, check out our video-based VEX Curriculum Series completely for free to help you get started with programming.

Click the following links for more information and to start playing – robotvirtualworlds.com/ringmaster

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

April 25th, 2017 at 7:00 pm

Congrats to our VEX Virtual Programming Challenge Winners!

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We are very excited to officially announce the winners of our VEX Virtual Programming Skills Challenge for both VEX EDR and VEX IQ! Winners of each competition received an invitation for their team to the VEX World Championship — April 19-22, 2017 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

 
VEX EDR Winner: Eagle Engineering (Team # 1138B)

 

VEX IQ Winner: MS of Gao Xin 2 (Team # 1155B)

 

Congrats to both teams!! We look forward to seeing all them at VEX Worlds in a couple weeks!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

March 3rd, 2017 at 3:30 pm

The VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds 2017

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Robomatter, VEX Robotics, and the REC Foundation are excited to present low cost, high quality virtual competitions that enable students to test their problem solving and programming skills in the VEX Starstruck and VEX IQ Crossover Robot Virtual World Competitions. And, not only do these virtual competitions provide a great learning experience, you could also qualify for the 2017 VEX Worlds Championship!!
 

This Year’s Games

Both games simulate the single-player Robot Skills and Programming Skills modes of the physical Starstruck and Crossover competitions. However, only the Programming Skills modes of the Virtual simulations are awarded prizes. To participate in the competition, you must update your Robot Virtual World software.

 

starstruckflair

In the Starstruck Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, your goal is to score as many stars and cubes in your zones. You then must hang your robot on your hanging bar.

 

 

crossoverflair

For the Crossover Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, you must pick up the hexballs, score them in their colored scoring area, and then balance on the bridge.

 

Winners Qualify for VEX Worlds!

virtual-challenge-2017

The winners of the Robomatter sponsored VEX Starstruck and VEX IQ Crossover Virtual World competition will receive an invitation to the VEX World Championship April 19-25, 2017 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville Kentucky!

Important Deadlines:

  • Submissions for both contests are due by January 11, 2017.
  • Winners will be announced by February 1, 2017

To learn more about the VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds, visit www.robotc.net/recf and visit www.cs2n.org/competitions to sign up!

VEX Starstruck and VEX IQ Crossover Robot Virtual Worlds Now Available!

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VEX RVW 16

We are thrilled to announce the availability of our two brand new virtual environments, the VEX EDR Robotics Competition – Starstruck and VEX IQ Challenge – Crossover. As in years past, these worlds are made available at the same time as their real world counterparts are unveiled at VEX Worlds!

The competitions for this year are both extremely exciting! With VEX Starstruck, matches are played on a field set up as seen below. The object of the game is to attain a high score by Scoring your Stars and Cubes in your Zones and by Hanging Robots on your Hanging Bar.

CORTEX Board

CORTEX Board 2

For VEX IQ Crossover, matches are played on a field set up as seen below. The object of the game is to attain the highest score by Scoring Hexballs in their colored Scoring Zone and Goals, and by Parking and Balancing Robots on the Bridge.

IQ Board 1

IQ Board 2

Using Robot Virtual Worlds will allow you to …

  • Practice programming in the 2016-2017 game right away
  • Compete with your classmates, or online (starting in the Fall)
  • Form strategies using the virtual field
  • Develop and test code on a simulated robot before running code on a real robot!

To help you get started with these new Robot Virtual Worlds, check out our video-based VEX Curriculum Series completely for free to help you get started with programming.

Click the following links for more information and to start play today – VEX Robotics Competition – Starstruck Virtual World, and here for the VEX IQ Challenge – Crossover Robot Virtual World.

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

April 22nd, 2016 at 6:13 pm

Congrats to our VEX Virtual Programming Challenge Winners!

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Virtual Winners

We are very excited to officially announce the winners of our VEX Virtual Programming Skills Challenge for both VEX EDR and VEX IQ! Winners of each competition received an invitation for their team to the VEX World Championship — April 20-23, 2016 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

VEX EDR Winner: Friarbots B (Team # 3309B) from Anaheim, CA. The team member who received the high score was Matthew Krager.

Frairbots

VEX IQ Winner: Flash Robotics (Team # 5194a) from London, England. The team member who received the high score was Dominic Vald.

Flash Robotics

We’d also like to congrats the VEX EDR runner-up who will be attending VEX Worlds with the challenge invite, since Friarbots qualified for Worlds at their local competition. VEX EDR Runner-Up: Univ. Tec. de Altamira (Team # TAL2), from Alltarmira, Mexico. The team member who received the high score was Victor Francisco Chavez Bermudez

We look forward to seeing all them at VEX Worlds in a couple weeks!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

April 7th, 2016 at 6:15 am

Winners of our Virtual World Challenge – Validation Needed!

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splash-image_RECF1

We are excited to say we have our winners in our Robot Virtual Worlds VEX Challenge! However, we are waiting for final validation from teams. If you participated in the challenge, please check your email as soon as possible so we can lock down your spot to VEX Worlds. We look forward to announcing the winners soon!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

March 9th, 2016 at 6:00 am

Latest High Scores for our VEX Virtual Programming Skills Challenges!

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Updated Scores Can Be Found Here!

As some of you may know, we along with VEX Robotics and the REC Foundation have an exciting competition going on right now with the VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenges for Robot Virtual Worlds. This competition offers a low cost, high quality virtual competitions that enable students to test their problem solving and programming skills in the VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World Competitions. And, not only do these virtual competitions provide a great learning experience, the winner of each competition will receive an invitation to the VEX World Championship — April 20-23, 2016 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville, Kentucky!

The competition kicked off a few months ago, and it is time to share our latest high scores …

VEX Scores Together

You still have one more month to compete and try to beat these high scores for a chance to qualify for VEX Worlds! Think you can do it? Learn more here robotc.net/recf and visit www.cs2n.org/competitions to sign up!

Important Deadlines:

  • Submissions for both contests are due by March 1, 2016.
  • Winners will be announced on March 11, 2016!

And remember, you must submit both your score and code through CS2N.org to officially register for the competition.

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

February 1st, 2016 at 12:32 pm

The VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds

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VEX RVW

Robomatter, VEX Robotics, and the REC Foundation are excited to present low cost, high quality virtual competitions that enable students to test their problem solving and programming skills in the VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World Competitions. And, not only do these virtual competitions provide a great learning experience, you could qualify for the 2016 VEX Worlds!

This Year’s Games

Both games simulate the single-player Robot Skills and Programming Skills modes of the physical Nothing But Net and Bank Shot competitions.

In the Nothing But Net Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, your goal is to program your virtual robot to put as many balls as you can in the Low and High goals, and by Elevating Robots in your Climbing Zone.

 

For the Bank Shot Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, your robot will need to pick up balls and make some tricky bank shots! The object of Bank Shot is to attain the highest score by Emptying Cutouts, Scoring Balls into the Scoring Zone and Goals, and by Parking Robots on the Ramp. There are a total of forty-four Balls available as Scoring Objects in the game, with one Scoring Zone, one Goal, and one Ramp on the field.

Winners Qualify for VEX Worlds!

splash-image_RECF

The winners of the Robomatter sponsored VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World competition will receive an invitation to the VEX World Championship April 20-23, 2016 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville Kentucky!

Important Deadlines:

  • Submissions for both contests are due by March 1, 2016.
  • Winners will be announced on March 11, 2016!

To learn more about the VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds, visit www.robotc.net/recf and visit www.cs2n.org/competitions to sign up!

Written by LeeAnn Baronett

November 17th, 2015 at 6:00 am

Student POV: Droids Robotics

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DroidsIn our newest edition of Student POV, we have Sanjay and Arvind Seshan, who are members of the robotics team, Not the Droids You Are Looking For (Droids Robotics) from Pittsburgh, PA, USA. They are actively involved in robotics all year around, whether competing themselves or teaching others. They constantly share some great pictures on their Twitter page of their team and outreach programs, so we’ve asked them to share some of their experiences in robotics …

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Droids 01Our first exposure to robotics was in 2010 when we decided to visit a FIRST LEGO League tournament at the National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC). We were excited by what we saw and, the next summer, we purchased an NXT LEGO Mindstorms kit and learnt to program using Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy’s NXT Video Trainer.

We haven’t stopped since! In 2011, we started our own neighborhood-based robotics team with eight other friends. We have participated in FIRST LEGO League as well as VEX IQ contests since then. You can read more about us on our team website (www.droidsrobotics.org).

Benefits of Robotics:

Droids 02Participating in robotics has taught us several programming languages, as well as general computer science skills and presentation skills. We now code in NXT-G, EV3-G, ROBOTC, Python and HTML as a direct result of robotics. We are comfortable interviewing experts as well as being interviewed about our work.

We use these skills outside of robotics contests to create webpages, and make online tools and programming tutorials. We even developed a robot in Minecraft that uses Python code to complete tasks. One sDroids 03ummer, we participated in a 24-hour coding contest called Code Extreme. For that event, we created a bicycle renting system using a Raspberry Pi and an RFID reader.

Robotics has taken us to some interesting places: the inside of a Smart House for seniors, under the hood of an airplane engine, and even to a sulfur dioxide sensor manufacturing plant. These field trips have shown us many different STEM careers we might choose from.

Spreading our love for robotics:

We do many robotics outreach activities all year round. We have been invited to teach other students at the Carnegie Science Center and four local libraries in the Pittsburgh area. At these events, we try to introduce students to LEGO Mindstorms, VEX IQ, EV3-G, and ROBOTC. Kids are naturally attracted to robots, and our hands-on workshops have been very popular. In September 2014, we expanded this outreach beyond Pittsburgh by teaching students around the world to program robots using our own lessons and website (EV3Lessons.com).

Challenges of Robotics:

The biggest challenge in robotics is probably robot reliability – getting your robot to “behave” as you intend again and again. It takes both software and hardware solutions in combination to improve reliability. To add to this problem, contest environments are often very different from practice environments. Kids who don’t have access to good programming lessons like the ones provided by ROBOTC, CS2N, Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy’s EV3 Trainer, and EV3Lessons.com often feel frustrated.

Droids 04The challenges in robotics are not problems you cannot solve. They are part of what makes robotics interesting for us. They teach us to come up with different techniques as solutions. They also teach us patience and perseverance!

Overall, robotics has given us opportunities and skills that we might not have discovered otherwise. The greatest opportunity from robotics is finding out what all a robot can do! People some times think that a child’s robot “can only do so much”. We have found that it can lead to learning a lot of advanced programming techniques.

Robotics has opened up a world of possibilities for us. We especially like sharing these possibilities with other people we meet at our workshops and demos.

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You can find more information about their team here: www.droidsrobotics.org and on their programming lessons here: www.ev3lessons.com.

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

March 24th, 2015 at 6:45 am

Student POV: Slalom Challenge

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It’s Danica and Jake, back again! This time, teaching people about the slalom challenge, in ROBOTC Graphical Language for the VEX IQ platform. The challenge is to line follow using the VEX IQ color sensor without hitting the “mines”, also known as the cups.

#5

In the graphical organizer, to line follow on the left side of the line, all you have to do is use the block, lineTrackLeft, to follow the right side you have to use lineTrackRight.

#1

In this block, there are 3 boxes, one for the threshold, the second for the speed of the left motor, and the last box is for the speed of the right motor. In this line of code, the threshold of 105, the robot’s left motor is set to go at 50% power, and the right motor is set to go at 15% power.

This block has to be included into a repeat loop to make sure the robot continues to do this command for an allotted amount of time.

#2

The repeatUntil loop has many options for how long the loop should run. For this challenge, we decided to use the timer.

#3

The timer is set at 7000 milliseconds or 7 seconds, so it has enough time to make it through the slalom. Our finished program looks like this:

#4

Now you can line follow in any challenge you would like, the possibilities are endless!

 
 

Robomatter Blog Ad VEX IQ

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

April 2nd, 2014 at 7:47 am