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Best #ROBOTC Twitter Posts – 3rd Edition

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We LOVE getting Twitter posts sent to us about ROBOTC. In the last few months, you have shared even more great posts and pictures with us. We decided to make a THIRD compilation of some of our favorites so you can check out some of the cool projects going on …

Do you have a ROBOTC picture/video/post you would like to share with us on Twitter? If so, include #ROBOTC or @ROBOTC in your message.

Written by Cara Friez

June 18th, 2015 at 12:34 pm

Robotics Summer of Learning Starts Today!

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SummerOfLearning2015_UPDATED

Robotics Summer of Learning Opens Today!

The Robotics Summer of Learning (RSOL) opens today! This summer, students have the opportunity to learn how to program virtual robots using a FREE copy of Robot Virtual Worlds where they can program VEX IQ or LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 virtual robotsAll RSOL courses are self-paced with e-mail support available at rsol@cs2n.org.

Sign up here!

 

 


Learn to Code : Learn to Think!

Just a few of the great reasons to join this year’s Robotics Summer of Learning:

  • All software and trainings are free for the entire summer.
  • No robotics hardware required.
  • Access to self-paced training and high quality curriculum designed to help new users.
  • Learning to program with Virtual robots takes 1/3 less time compared to physical robots! Read more about the study results here!
  • ROBOTC Graphical allows you to drag and drop blocks of code from the menu to get your program created even faster!
  • Earn a programming certificate and badges from CMU’s Robotics Academy.

 

It’s Easy To Get Started!

1. Visit The Computer Science Student Network

If you do not already have aCS2N account, sign up for free! Then click one of our Summer of Learning Courses (VEX IQ or LEGO EV3) to register.

 

 

 

 

2. Download the Software

Follow the instructions on CS2N to download bothRobot Virtual Worlds andROBOTC for free!

 

 

 

 

 

3. Start Programming!

Have fun learning how to code with fun Robot Virtual Worlds!

 

 

 

Sign up here!

 

Written by Cara Friez

June 15th, 2015 at 9:09 am

The Robotics Summer of Learning is Back!

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SOL Coming Soon

We are proud to announce the return of our Robotics Summer of Learning program! This summer, students have the opportunity to learn how to program robots, earn a programming certificate and badges, and play with cool software for FREE! We will provide all of the software and training materials at no cost to you or your students.  The course will consist of three modules: movement, sensing, and program flow and will be taught using the Robot Virtual World software.

The Robotics Summer of Learning starts June 15th, register here and we’ll send you a reminder when it opens up!

A Teacher’s POV Blog Series

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Teacher POVWe’ve had some wonderful teachers share their stories with us this year about their experience in the classroom teaching robotics. Read their stories here in our Teacher’s POV blog series.

Here are a few recent posts:

– International School Manila
– Palisades Middle School Robotics Initiative
– RVW VEX IQ Beltway
– First Year Teaching Automation and Robotics

Do you have a story to share about implementing STEM into your classroom, a cool project you did with your students/team, or advice about teaching robotics? If so, send us an email at socialmedia@robomatter.com and be a guest blogger for us. We would love to share your stories on our blog!

 

Written by Cara Friez

June 10th, 2015 at 11:34 am

VEX Users: Program Virtual Robots Without Downloading Anything New!

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Have You Explored New Worlds with ROBOTC?

ROBOTC has provided you with many challenges and learning opportunities, but did you know you can explore exciting new virtual worlds without downloading anything new? Try out Robot Virtual Worlds for FREE in ROBOTC with a 10-day trial!

See the instructions to get started at the bottom of this email!

What are Robot Virtual Worlds?

Robot Virtual Worlds are high-end simulation environments that enables users, without robots, to learn programming with game and competition worlds. Watch our video for more information!

Game Worlds!

Escape to one of our fantastic game worlds where you can use your programming skills to explore and complete challenges!

Ruins of Atlantis

We thought Atlantis was a myth. We were wrong. Your mission is to explore the Ruins of Atlantis, 6,000 meters below the surface of the ocean, collecting data and treasure as you do.

Palm Island Luau Edition

Visit the beautiful Palm Island and program your robot to drive along its boardwalk path. Collect coconut clusters and set lobster traps for the Luau.

Operation Reset

The mining colony of Alpha Base H99 needs your help! A terrible storm has damaged the colony’s equipment and we need you to use your programming skills to complete the mission.

Competition Worlds!

Practice your programming skills with virtual versions of popular robotic competitions.

VEX Nothing But Net

Try to get the most points by collecting and scoring the balls and bonus balls into the Low and High Goals. Elevate your robot into the climbing zone for bonus points!

VEX IQ Bank Shot

Get the highest score by emptying the ball cutouts, and scoring the balls into the scoring zone. More points if you can make a bank shot into the goal!

VEX Highrise Beltway

Autonomously score as many cubes as possible during the time period. Zoom around the beltway to move around. Beltway is a modified version of the VEX IQ Highrise competition game.

Getting Started

Starting your Virtual Worlds trial:

1.  Open ROBOTC (from the icon on your desktop or Start Menu).

2.  Click “Help”
in the menu and select “Manage Licenses”.


3.
  Click “Add License” in the menu and select “Robot Virtual Worlds – VEX” from the Product drop-down.

4.  Click “Start Trial”.

5.  Click “Close”.

Using Virtual Worlds:

1.  Click “Robot” in the menu and set the “Compiler Target” to “Virtual Worlds”.

2.  Click “Window” in the menu and set “Select a Virtual World to Use” to any of the virtual worlds installed.

Visit robotvirtualworlds.com to explore and download more levels!

If you need to go back to programming your physical robot, select “Physical Robot” from the “Compiler Target” menu.

Written by Cara Friez

June 9th, 2015 at 9:42 am

LEGO Users: Program Virtual Robots Without Downloading Anything New!

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Have You Explored New Worlds with ROBOTC?

ROBOTC has provided you with many challenges and learning opportunities, but did you know you can explore exciting new virtual worlds without downloading anything new? Try out Robot Virtual Worlds for FREE in ROBOTC with a 10-day trial!

See the instructions to get started at the bottom of this email!

What are Robot Virtual Worlds?

Robot Virtual Worlds are high-end simulation environments that enables users, without robots, to learn programming with game and competition worlds. Watch our video for more information!

Game Worlds!

Escape to one of our fantastic game worlds where you can use your programming skills to explore and complete challenges!

Ruins of Atlantis

We thought Atlantis was a myth. We were wrong. Your mission is to explore the Ruins of Atlantis, 6,000 meters below the surface of the ocean, collecting data and treasure as you do.

Palm Island Luau Edition

Visit the beautiful Palm Island and program your robot to drive along its boardwalk path. Collect coconut clusters and set lobster traps for the Luau.

Operation Reset

The mining colony of Alpha Base H99 needs your help! A terrible storm has damaged the colony’s equipment and we need you to use your programming skills to complete the mission.

Virtual Challenges!

Practice your programming skills with virtual versions of popular robotic competitions or challenging obstacle courses.

Curriculum Companion

Practice valuable programming concepts with a variety of activities using the curriculum companion. Use the same ROBOTC code to program your real and virtual robots!

Level Builder

The RVW Level Builder provides a 12’x12′ square field to build on and several objects – from cans and boxes to line tracking tiles – that you can use to design challenging, unique, and fun levels!

Measurement Toolkit

Not sure how far to make your robot move? Use the virtual measurement tools to calculate the distance and angles needed to move around in the virtual worlds!

Getting Started

Starting your Virtual Worlds trial:

1.  Open ROBOTC (from the icon on your desktop or Start Menu).

2.  Click “Help”
in the menu and select “Manage Licenses”.

3.  Click “Add License” in the menu and select “Robot Virtual Worlds – LEGO” from the Product drop-down.


4.
  Click “Start Trial”.

5.  Click “Close”.


Using Virtual Worlds:

1.  Click “Robot” in the menu and set the “Compiler Target” to “Virtual Worlds”.

2.  Click “Window” in the menu and set “Select a Virtual World to Use” to any of the virtual worlds installed.

Visit robotvirtualworlds.com to explore and download more levels!

If you need to go back to programming your physical robot, select “Physical Robot” from the “Compiler Target” menu.

 

Written by Cara Friez

June 9th, 2015 at 9:41 am

Summer Teacher Trainings are Filling Up Quickly!

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ban_eduProDev
 

Our on-site (in Pittsburgh, PA) and online Summer Professional Development classes for VEX CORTEX, VEX IQ, and LEGO MINDSTORMS are filling up quickly. Register today to make sure you get into your preferred course (listed below!)

Highlights of the Robotics Academy Training:

  • Acquire new skills with technology and new ways to teach STEM with robotics using innovative pedagogy!
  • No Prior Experience with Robotics or Programming required!
  • Hands-On Experience with 36 Contact Hours!
  • Learn directly from the curriculum and technology developers!

 

Here’s What People Are Saying After Our Trainings:

“You guys were fantastic! This was some of the most enjoyable and informative professional development I’ve ever attended. The instructor was incredibly knowledgeable and always willing to offer help when needed. I would recommend the Robotics Academy to any teacher that is wanting to get into robotics education.”

“I thought that just about every aspect of the sessions was valuable. As a person coming in with an almost zero knowledge base, I left feeling I had a strong sense of how things work and how I can immediately implement things in my classroom.”

“Instructors were great … this stands as one of the most enjoyable workshops/courses I have taken in a VERY long time. I learned a lot, I had a good time, I was challenged … what course could hope for a better outcome than this.”

 

Find out more at CMU Robotics Academy Professional Development!

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VEX and VEX IQ

ban_vexTeacherTraining
On-Site Classes:

ROBOTC for VEX CORTEX
July 6 – 10, 2015
July 27 – 31, 2015

ROBOTC for VEX IQ
June 22 – 26, 2015
July 13 – 17, 2015

Online Classes:

ROBOTC Online Training for VEX CORTEX
June 22 – 26, 2015
Monday-Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EDT (12 – 3pm PDT)

ROBOTC Online Training for VEX IQ
Jul 6 – 10, 2015
Monday-Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EDT (12 – 3pm PDT)

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LEGO

ban_legoTeacherTraining
On-Site Classes:

ROBOTC for LEGO
June 29 – July 3, 2015
July 20- 24, 2015

Online Classes:

ROBOTC Online Training for LEGO
Jul 13 – 17, 2015
Monday-Friday for 1 week
3 – 5pm EDT (12 – 3pm PDT)

Written by Cara Friez

May 8th, 2015 at 5:30 am

A Teacher’s POV: Palisades Middle School Robotics Initiative

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Palisades1

Training at Carnegie Robotics Academy

After last summer’s on-site training at Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy, Palisades Middle School’s technology and computer teachers initiated semester STEM units featuring the VEX Cortex Clawbot, Robot Virtual Worlds software, and ROBOTC programming. 8th grade students now experience how to build and program a robot through collaborative teamwork.

In technology class groups of students learn about robotic systems and mechanics by building and remotely controlling a VEX Clawbot. In computer class students program the VEX Cortex Clawbot in a virtual, immersive environment using Robot Virtual Worlds software and through coursework provided by Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy’s CS2N Moodle-based learning management system. By combining their knowledge and skills in groups, students will ultimately compete using autonomous and remote-control programming in a class competition called, “Tic Tech Toe”.

Palisades2

Julia, 8th grade middle school student

I attend Palisades Middle School and am in the 8th grade. I love how both our computer and technology class are combined. Being brand new to the whole experience of robotics, finding new ways to use technology educationally is something that really intrigues me. Currently I am in computer class and cannot compare it to anything else. Overall, the atmosphere and supportive people make this experience fun and worthwhile. It has introduced me to concepts that I didn’t even know were possible and are very educational. For example, I have recently learned to use a very cool program called ROBOTC. Basically, ROBOTC is a program which allows you to give your robot “tasks”. In my computer class we have been doing this quite a bit and I just love everything about it. Its a new and educational way for students to learn programming. My learning this at a young age really builds success for the future.

Lydia, 8th grade middle school student

Student-Created Simulated Field  Created in RVW Level Builder

Student-Created Simulated Field
Created in RVW Level Builder

Our technology and computer classes joined together while working on robotics. I really enjoyed being able to create and program robots. In our tech class each student was assigned a partner to build a robot and race it in a competition against fellow classmates. Our computer class involved robotic programming.We learned how to compile and download programs to a virtual robot and complete different challenges. This program was so much fun and I really enjoyed how we got to experience both “hands-on” and “hands-off” learning.

Making Robotics Real for Students

There is a real advantage in learning how to program in a virtual environment. Most programming courses offer 2-dimensional “Hello World” feedback. Robot Virtual Worlds gives students immediate 3-D feedback and opens their eyes to real-world programming applications. We have been pleasantly surprised with how students respond with interest to learning how to program when it’s presented in this context.

Robot Virtual Worlds also offers an engaging method of project-oriented learning involving challenges. Students don’t just program the robot to move, they learn what it would be like to manipulate a robot through various simulated environments. These environments called “worlds” could be a space mission, tropical island, or could even be student-designed obstacle field. These worlds have been effective in stimulating interest and maintaining learner engagement.

Palisades4In addition to the classroom experience, our first semester students also visited a local robotics company and learned first-hand how their robotics experiences have real-world relevance. Students were given the opportunity to see actual robots in development and other related technologies. This visit got the student’s attention, providing them with a better understanding of potential opportunities in engineering and programming.

We are anxious to continue this collaborative program. There was an initial investment in training, software, and hardware, but we feel that the return for the students is well worth it. In sharing our classes and resources, students are learning about information and machine technology in a unique way. We hope that this transfers over into their continuing studies and even future careers.

National Robotics Week – VEX IQ Challenge!

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NRWeek

To celebrate National Robotics Week, we’ve opened up our FREE VEX IQ Virtual Challenge for everyone to participate!!

The VEX IQ Virtual Challenge is part of an ongoing research project by Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy and the University of Pittsburgh’s Learning Research and Development Center designed to assist robotics teams learning to program.

Participating students will learn programming that enables them to solve this year’s VEX IQ Virtual Highrise Challenge. As they learn they will also earn an Introduction to Robotics and Programming Certification.

Robomatter is pleased to be working closely with the Robotics Academy to create high quality STEM learning experiences, and has agreed to provide access to all related materials FOR FREE to celebrate National Robotics Week!

beltway medium

The game available for the challenge is VEX IQ Highrise Beltway! In Beltway, you will program your VEX IQ robot to autonomously score as many cubes as possible during the 2 minute period. The standard Highrise game has been augmented with a conveyor belt around the perimeter and several other game play elements. Click here for a more extensive list of the new rules and game play. Beltway is available in the latest update to the VEX IQ Highrise Robot Virtual World download.

Check out our gameplay video to see it in action …

And also read our most recent Teacher POV post that highlight VEX IQ Beltway!

Sign up for the challenge today!

Happy Programming!!

Written by Cara Friez

March 30th, 2015 at 10:12 am

Student POV: Droids Robotics

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DroidsIn our newest edition of Student POV, we have Sanjay and Arvind Seshan, who are members of the robotics team, Not the Droids You Are Looking For (Droids Robotics) from Pittsburgh, PA, USA. They are actively involved in robotics all year around, whether competing themselves or teaching others. They constantly share some great pictures on their Twitter page of their team and outreach programs, so we’ve asked them to share some of their experiences in robotics …

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Droids 01Our first exposure to robotics was in 2010 when we decided to visit a FIRST LEGO League tournament at the National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC). We were excited by what we saw and, the next summer, we purchased an NXT LEGO Mindstorms kit and learnt to program using Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy’s NXT Video Trainer.

We haven’t stopped since! In 2011, we started our own neighborhood-based robotics team with eight other friends. We have participated in FIRST LEGO League as well as VEX IQ contests since then. You can read more about us on our team website (www.droidsrobotics.org).

Benefits of Robotics:

Droids 02Participating in robotics has taught us several programming languages, as well as general computer science skills and presentation skills. We now code in NXT-G, EV3-G, ROBOTC, Python and HTML as a direct result of robotics. We are comfortable interviewing experts as well as being interviewed about our work.

We use these skills outside of robotics contests to create webpages, and make online tools and programming tutorials. We even developed a robot in Minecraft that uses Python code to complete tasks. One sDroids 03ummer, we participated in a 24-hour coding contest called Code Extreme. For that event, we created a bicycle renting system using a Raspberry Pi and an RFID reader.

Robotics has taken us to some interesting places: the inside of a Smart House for seniors, under the hood of an airplane engine, and even to a sulfur dioxide sensor manufacturing plant. These field trips have shown us many different STEM careers we might choose from.

Spreading our love for robotics:

We do many robotics outreach activities all year round. We have been invited to teach other students at the Carnegie Science Center and four local libraries in the Pittsburgh area. At these events, we try to introduce students to LEGO Mindstorms, VEX IQ, EV3-G, and ROBOTC. Kids are naturally attracted to robots, and our hands-on workshops have been very popular. In September 2014, we expanded this outreach beyond Pittsburgh by teaching students around the world to program robots using our own lessons and website (EV3Lessons.com).

Challenges of Robotics:

The biggest challenge in robotics is probably robot reliability – getting your robot to “behave” as you intend again and again. It takes both software and hardware solutions in combination to improve reliability. To add to this problem, contest environments are often very different from practice environments. Kids who don’t have access to good programming lessons like the ones provided by ROBOTC, CS2N, Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy’s EV3 Trainer, and EV3Lessons.com often feel frustrated.

Droids 04The challenges in robotics are not problems you cannot solve. They are part of what makes robotics interesting for us. They teach us to come up with different techniques as solutions. They also teach us patience and perseverance!

Overall, robotics has given us opportunities and skills that we might not have discovered otherwise. The greatest opportunity from robotics is finding out what all a robot can do! People some times think that a child’s robot “can only do so much”. We have found that it can lead to learning a lot of advanced programming techniques.

Robotics has opened up a world of possibilities for us. We especially like sharing these possibilities with other people we meet at our workshops and demos.

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You can find more information about their team here: www.droidsrobotics.org and on their programming lessons here: www.ev3lessons.com.

Written by Cara Friez

March 24th, 2015 at 6:45 am