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VEX Starstruck and VEX IQ Crossover Robot Virtual Worlds Now Available!

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VEX RVW 16

We are thrilled to announce the availability of our two brand new virtual environments, the VEX EDR Robotics Competition – Starstruck and VEX IQ Challenge – Crossover. As in years past, these worlds are made available at the same time as their real world counterparts are unveiled at VEX Worlds!

The competitions for this year are both extremely exciting! With VEX Starstruck, matches are played on a field set up as seen below. The object of the game is to attain a high score by Scoring your Stars and Cubes in your Zones and by Hanging Robots on your Hanging Bar.

CORTEX Board

CORTEX Board 2

For VEX IQ Crossover, matches are played on a field set up as seen below. The object of the game is to attain the highest score by Scoring Hexballs in their colored Scoring Zone and Goals, and by Parking and Balancing Robots on the Bridge.

IQ Board 1

IQ Board 2

Using Robot Virtual Worlds will allow you to …

  • Practice programming in the 2016-2017 game right away
  • Compete with your classmates, or online (starting in the Fall)
  • Form strategies using the virtual field
  • Develop and test code on a simulated robot before running code on a real robot!

To help you get started with these new Robot Virtual Worlds, check out our video-based VEX Curriculum Series completely for free to help you get started with programming.

Click the following links for more information and to start play today – VEX Robotics Competition – Starstruck Virtual World, and here for the VEX IQ Challenge – Crossover Robot Virtual World.

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

April 22nd, 2016 at 6:13 pm

Congrats to our VEX Virtual Programming Challenge Winners!

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Virtual Winners

We are very excited to officially announce the winners of our VEX Virtual Programming Skills Challenge for both VEX EDR and VEX IQ! Winners of each competition received an invitation for their team to the VEX World Championship — April 20-23, 2016 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

VEX EDR Winner: Friarbots B (Team # 3309B) from Anaheim, CA. The team member who received the high score was Matthew Krager.

Frairbots

VEX IQ Winner: Flash Robotics (Team # 5194a) from London, England. The team member who received the high score was Dominic Vald.

Flash Robotics

We’d also like to congrats the VEX EDR runner-up who will be attending VEX Worlds with the challenge invite, since Friarbots qualified for Worlds at their local competition. VEX EDR Runner-Up: Univ. Tec. de Altamira (Team # TAL2), from Alltarmira, Mexico. The team member who received the high score was Victor Francisco Chavez Bermudez

We look forward to seeing all them at VEX Worlds in a couple weeks!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

April 7th, 2016 at 6:15 am

Explore National Robotics Week with Robot Virtual Worlds

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nationalroboticsweek_twitter

 
To help celebrate National Robotics Week, we’ve created a FREE, online version of our Robot Virtual Worlds software, which you can use in your classroom to teach students about robotics and introductory programming concepts.

For the week of April 4th (and the rest of April!) we’ve opened up a free, online version of our Ruins of Atlantis Robot Virtual World, as well as a number of other Robot Virtual World challenges.

 

We thought Atlantis was a myth. We were wrong.

 
ruins of atlantis screenshot with controlsExplore the Ruins of Atlantis, 6,000 meters below the surface of the ocean, collecting data and treasure as you do!

Ruins of Atlantis is one of our Robot Virtual Worlds, themed in a fantasy, underwater environment. It’s designed to teach and reinforce behavior-based programming in a fun and meaningful way. While immersed in a scaffolded programming environment, students practice robot programming, using a full set of virtual motors and sensors on exciting new robots, 6000 meters below the surface of the ocean.

The level design of Ruins of Atlantis features a path that includes collectible objects and additional starting points, making it ideal for teaching introductory programming concepts such as path planning and encoder based movements. Even though the robots in Atlantis do not resemble the real classroom robots, students can use the same programming languages (EV3, NXT-G, ROBOTC, etc.) to control them.

Visit our National Robotics Week website to get started!

 

More Robotics Fun!

 
In addition to Ruins of Atlantis, you can also access free, online versions of the following Robot Virtual Worlds Challenges:

  • Maze Challenge: This challenge features a sequence of turns that the robot must perform in order to get to the “end” of the maze. The robot must first begin at the starting point, and get to the goal area by completing turning and forward movement behaviors.
     
    maze challenge
  • Basic Movement 1 Programming: In this challenge, you will program your robot to pick up the three green cubes on the far side of the field and drop them into the green goal on the near side of the field, one at a time.
     
    basic movement 1
  • Basic Movement 2 Programming: In this challenge, you will program your robot to pick up one red cube, navigate to the red goal without bumping any of the walls, and drop the cube into the goal
     
    Basic movement 2

Visit our National Robotics Week website to learn more!

 

Robot Virtual Worlds + Research-Based Curriculum = Excellent STEM Education

 
STEMWith lots of research from the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy backing it up, Robot Virtual Worlds is a great tool to create a scaffold learning experience that teaches students important math, programming, proportional reasoning, and computational thinking skills. That’s we’ve built Robot Virtual Worlds into our STEM Curriculum.

Our curriculum does more than simply teach students basic facts and concepts. We teach students skills they need to be successful in the real world. Here are a few highlights:

  • Learner-centered instruction built on research that’s been proven in the real-world
  • Helps students develop 21st Century college and career readiness skills
  • Teaches important skills in foundational mathematics, engineering, programming, problem-solving, creative thinking, and computational thinking
  • Designed to provide structured problem-based learning that:
    • Provides guidance to both students and teachers
    • Scaffolds difficult concepts and complex tasks
    • Schedules class time closely so that no class time is wasted
    • Requires students to generalize their understanding and apply learning across contexts

To learn more about our curriculum, visit our website or send us an email at STEMSolutions@robomatter.com.

Written by LeeAnn Baronett

April 4th, 2016 at 6:00 am

Mexico’s ROBOTC and Robot Virtual Worlds Software Programming Contest

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reeduca-logoIn early 2015, our partner, Reeduca, started the ROBOTC and Robot Virtual Worlds (RVW) Software Programming Contest for both public and private school students in Mexico. Reeduca started the contest as a way to introduce students, teachers, parents, and educators to computer science and its benefits.

In order to reach the ROBOTC and RVW National Championship, students had to qualify through pre-national tournaments in each zone of Mexico. The best programmers were selected to move onto the National Championship.

Check out this video to see programmers in action at Mexico’s ROBOTC and Robot Virtual Worlds National Championship!

Written by LeeAnn Baronett

March 18th, 2016 at 5:23 am

UPDATE – NEW High Scores for our VEX Virtual Programming Skills Challenges!

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The competition kicked off a few months ago, and we have NEW HIGH SCORES to share with you …

VEX Both Scores

As some of you may know, we along with VEX Robotics and the REC Foundation have an exciting competition going on right now with the VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenges for Robot Virtual Worlds. This competition offers a low cost, high quality virtual competitions that enable students to test their problem solving and programming skills in the VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World Competitions. And, not only do these virtual competitions provide a great learning experience, the winner of each competition will receive an invitation to the VEX World Championship — April 20-23, 2016 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville, Kentucky!

You still have one more week to compete and try to beat these high scores for a chance to qualify for VEX Worlds! Think you can do it? Learn more here robotc.net/recf and visit www.cs2n.org/competitions to sign up!

Important Deadlines:

  • Submissions for both contests are due by March 1, 2016.
  • Winners will be announced on March 11, 2016!

And remember, you must submit both your score and code through CS2N.org to officially register for the competition.

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

February 22nd, 2016 at 9:52 am

Latest High Scores for our VEX Virtual Programming Skills Challenges!

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Updated Scores Can Be Found Here!

As some of you may know, we along with VEX Robotics and the REC Foundation have an exciting competition going on right now with the VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenges for Robot Virtual Worlds. This competition offers a low cost, high quality virtual competitions that enable students to test their problem solving and programming skills in the VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World Competitions. And, not only do these virtual competitions provide a great learning experience, the winner of each competition will receive an invitation to the VEX World Championship — April 20-23, 2016 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville, Kentucky!

The competition kicked off a few months ago, and it is time to share our latest high scores …

VEX Scores Together

You still have one more month to compete and try to beat these high scores for a chance to qualify for VEX Worlds! Think you can do it? Learn more here robotc.net/recf and visit www.cs2n.org/competitions to sign up!

Important Deadlines:

  • Submissions for both contests are due by March 1, 2016.
  • Winners will be announced on March 11, 2016!

And remember, you must submit both your score and code through CS2N.org to officially register for the competition.

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

February 1st, 2016 at 12:32 pm

Article: Robotic Competition Moves into Virtual World

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AR-160119213The NWF Daily News in North West Florida published an article highlighting our Robot Virtual World competitions, focusing on our newest competition, the virtual Mini-Urban Challenge. The article talks about how our virtual competition is being used to help students test out their design before moving into the physical robotics competition. “Robomatter’s virtual world will test and exercise the Mini-Urban Challenge robots,” Steve Butler, the director of Doolittle Institute said. “The connection of our Mini-Urban ‘real world’ test environment to a bigger, simulated world will greatly enrich the experience of the participating students.”

 

Mini Urban Vs
 

To read the entire article, visit here – Robotic Competition Moves into Virtual World

To find out more about the Mini-Urban Challenge, visit their website here!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

January 21st, 2016 at 10:24 am

Announcing the Mini Urban Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds!

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Mini Urban Challenge

We are very excited to announce a brand new Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, Mini Urban Challenge! Our new virtual simulation is based off the national competition sponsored by The Doolittle Institute, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and Special Operations Command.

 


 

The purpose of this competition is to design and program a robotic vehicle that can autonomously navigate a mini-urban city, using a virtual LEGO® MINDSTORMS® EV3 robot. The robot must enter the mini-urban city from a home base, travel through the city to assigned parking lots, park in any parking space in each assigned parking lot, and then exit the city by returning to the home base and parking in the home base. The robot should use the optimal path (shortest distance) through the mini-urban city to visit the parking lots. While in the city, the robot should obey traffic rules by stopping at stop signs and following standard right-of-way rules when other vehicles are encountered. You can find the official rule here.

Our new Robot Virtual World features three modes for the Mini Urban Challenge:

1. Practice Mode allows students to develop and test their code for the challenge, without worrying about scoring, penalties, or the clock.

2. Competition Mode is the standard version of the challenge field, complete with timing and scoring to reflect the real world competition.

2015-10-23_15-07-45

3. City Mode is an exciting, themed version of the challenge field, which also includes timing and scoring that reflect the real world competition.

2015-10-23_15-09-32

Download and install the Mini Urban Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds here! To submit your scores and compete with others, you will need a free account from the Computer Science Student Network!

The VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds

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VEX RVW

Robomatter, VEX Robotics, and the REC Foundation are excited to present low cost, high quality virtual competitions that enable students to test their problem solving and programming skills in the VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World Competitions. And, not only do these virtual competitions provide a great learning experience, you could qualify for the 2016 VEX Worlds!

This Year’s Games

Both games simulate the single-player Robot Skills and Programming Skills modes of the physical Nothing But Net and Bank Shot competitions.

In the Nothing But Net Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, your goal is to program your virtual robot to put as many balls as you can in the Low and High goals, and by Elevating Robots in your Climbing Zone.

 

For the Bank Shot Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, your robot will need to pick up balls and make some tricky bank shots! The object of Bank Shot is to attain the highest score by Emptying Cutouts, Scoring Balls into the Scoring Zone and Goals, and by Parking Robots on the Ramp. There are a total of forty-four Balls available as Scoring Objects in the game, with one Scoring Zone, one Goal, and one Ramp on the field.

Winners Qualify for VEX Worlds!

splash-image_RECF

The winners of the Robomatter sponsored VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World competition will receive an invitation to the VEX World Championship April 20-23, 2016 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville Kentucky!

Important Deadlines:

  • Submissions for both contests are due by March 1, 2016.
  • Winners will be announced on March 11, 2016!

To learn more about the VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds, visit www.robotc.net/recf and visit www.cs2n.org/competitions to sign up!

Written by LeeAnn Baronett

November 17th, 2015 at 6:00 am

Competing for the Future: Developing a Life-Long Interest in STEM, Part I

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LiveCareer Quote
A few weeks ago, we published an infographic that illustrates the STEM Problem: there are more and more STEM jobs out there, but fewer and fewer candidates who are qualified to fill them. But, taking a look at the job market shows that employers need more than employees who simply understand science, technology, engineering or math.

Degrees and credentials are important, but the development of soft skills—skills that are more social than technical—are a crucial part of fostering a dynamic workforce and are always in high demand.”[i]

Today’s job market needs graduates who excel in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), and who also excel in the areas of teamwork, communication, creative problem solving, project management, critical thinking, and leadership. Research shows[ii] that competitions are a fun and exciting way to combine STEM with the development of 21st century skills.

This is part one of a series of articles that will show how easy it is to host a competition at your school, in your classroom, in a club, or at your home! Over the next few weeks we will continue this article and suggest teacher-tested strategies that enable you to teach many of the competencies that you can teach via competitions and project based learning via a Virtual Competition.

Why Competitions?

IMG_7431Competitions are generally multifaceted and require participants to engage in a range of activities. Well designed competitions address academically challenging concepts and teach important 21st century skills like: research, ideation, prototype development, design reviews, presentations, and iterative design-develop- and test cycles, just to name a few. Competitions involve contextualized activities that enable kids to develop the soft skills that employers crave: leadership, written and oral communication, the ability to think on your feet, and the ability to present and defend your ideas. In competitions, these skills are nurtured in a fun and easy-to-understand manner, helping students develop competencies that they’ll use in college and future careers.

IMG_7441Research shows that after participating in competitions, students are more likely to take on additional STEM classes in high school and pursue STEM degrees and careers. Teachers also report that students who have participated in competitions are more comfortable using computers than students who haven’t participated in competitions.[iii] Research also shows that competitions increase students’ professional skills, like understanding the value of teamwork and the role of “gracious professionalism.” Competitions also increase students’ self-confidence, with 89% of students reporting more self-confidence after being part of a competition team.[iv] These are just a few of the reasons we’re big supporters of competitions and competition teams.

Compete Virtually, From Anywhere

splash-image_RECF
Our goal is to support education with multiple toolsets that engage and teach at the highest level. But, we know it can be difficult to find the requisite resources to start a team and travel to competitions, especially with the very real resource constraints so many schools face. That’s why we’ve partnered with the REC Foundation to create the VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds!

Robomatter, VEX Robotics, and the REC Foundation are really excited about presenting low cost, high quality virtual competitions that enable students to test their problem solving and programming skills in the VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World Competitions. And, not only do these virtual competitions provide a great learning experience, you could qualify for the 2016 VEX Worlds!

This Year’s Games

3Both games simulate the single-player Robot Skills and Programming Skills modes of the physical Nothing But Net and Bank Shot competitions.

In the Nothing But Net Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, your goal is to program your virtual robot to put as many balls as you can in the Low and High goals, and by Elevating Robots in your Climbing Zone.

F3or the Bank Shot Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, your robot will need to pick up balls and make some tricky bank shots! The object of Bank Shot is to attain the highest score by Emptying Cutouts, Scoring Balls into the Scoring Zone and Goals, and by Parking Robots on the Ramp. There are a total of forty-four Balls available as Scoring Objects in the game, with one Scoring Zone, one Goal, and one Ramp on the field.

Winners Qualify for VEX Worlds!

The winners of the Robomatter sponsored VEX Nothing But Net and VEX IQ Bank Shot Robot Virtual World competition will receive an invitation to the VEX World Championship April 20-23, 2016 at the Kentucky Expo Center in Louisville Kentucky!

Important Deadlines:

  • Submissions for both contests are due by March 1, 2016.
  • Winners will be announced on March 11, 2016!

To learn more about the VEX and VEX IQ Programming Skills Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds, visit www.robotc.net/recf and visit www.cs2n.org/competitions to sign up!

Announcing the 2016 REC Foundation & Robomatter Scholarship!

REC Foundation Robomatter Banner
Because Robomatter is so committed to advancing STEM education, we’re pleased to partner with the REC Foundation to offer one $5,000 scholarship to a high school junior or senior who will be pursuing a STEM degree in college! The deadline to apply is January 31, 2016. Learn more about the The 2016 REC Foundation & Robomatter Scholarship by reading our blog (link to blog) or visiting the REC Foundation website.

 

 

[i] “Careers | Top 10 Soft Skills in Demand | LiveCareer.” LiveCareer. LiveCareer.com, n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2015. <http://www.livecareer.com/career-tips/career-advice/soft-skills-in-demand>.

[ii] Robotics Competition: Providing Structure, Flexibility, and an Extensive Learning Experience – http://users.csc.calpoly.edu/~jseng/papers/grimes_seng.pdf

[iii] The Impact of Participation in VEX Robotics Competition on middle and high school students – http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CDcQFjADahUKEwj9nJmlkq7IAhXE_R4KHRpxC3Q&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.asee.org%2Fpublic%2Fconferences%2F8%2Fpapers%2F2994%2Fdownload&usg=AFQjCNGeCaxBzSsxmeyN7jMVLlaOFwFIXA&bvm=bv.104317490,d.dmo

[iv] More that Robots: An evaluation of the FIRST Robotics Competition – http://www.usfirst.org/uploadedFiles/Who/Impact/Brandeis_Studies/FRC_eval_finalrpt.pdf