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Cool Project: VEX IQ Tetris

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CP VEX IQ TETRISTetris is a beloved and well-known classic game that many of us have been addicted to at one point or another. We wait patiently for that perfect “Tetrimino” that will create a horizontal line so the board continues to move down so the game keeps going. Well, our latest Cool Project does just that, but on a VEX IQ brain and programmed in ROBOTC!

Petr Nejedly created the game as an experiment to see what could be done with the VEX IQ platform outside of robotics. He says, “I have coded it ad-hoc in one night. The code is pretty … short, not really pretty. 233 lines including (rare) comments.” When we spoke through email he mentioned that game is currently not random at all. “So, my son came to me, that he has an improvement to the program. That I should use this random() function, it will be more fun to play … Teachable moment! We have discussed, how a computer, a very exact instrument that always follows the same instructions and in fact only moves numbers here and there, come up with random numbers. What is a PRNG and how you have to seed it (srand()), what are real sources of randomness and what kind of issues such a lack of true randomness could cause in real world, besides lack of fun.” At this point, Petr said he would like to leave the actual fix to the curious readers/programmers out there to see what they can do with it. (Let us know if you do!)

Check out the game in action here:

Petr was nice enough to share the souce code, which you can download here. You can also read the original VEX IQ forum discussing the project here.

Do you have a cool ROBOTC project you want to share with the world? If so, send us an email at socialmedia@robomatter.com and we’ll post it on our blog and social media pages!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

December 3rd, 2015 at 6:15 am

Cool Project: EV3 Security Tank

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Cool Project EV3 TankKyle M. (aka Builderdude35) created a very cool project called the EV3 Krimzon Guard Security Tank! The tank is programmed in ROBOTC too, which was the first time Kyle programmed with our software. Kyle says, “[The EV3 Tank] features proportional IR beacon tracking, and a deadly-accurate turret targeting system. If that’s not enough, it also has a massive spiked steamroller on the front!”

 

 

 

 

Watch the tank in action here:

 

 

 

The tank includes an EV3 brick, two EV3 large motors, steam roller with spikes, a rotating dual-barrel turret, and three sensors! “There is a Mindsensors SumoEyes mounted on the chassis just above the steam roller (you will see the two red LED’s) that detects the targets in zones left, right or straight ahead. Just above that is a LEGO Infrared sensor that is used for beacon tracking. Lastly, there is a LEGO Ultrasonic sensor that rotates with the turret to confirm target acquisition.” Pretty awesome!

For a more detailed breakdown of the tank and code, visit his website here.

Do you have a cool ROBOTC project you want to share with the world? If so, send us an email at socialmedia@robomatter.com and we’ll post it on our blog and social media pages!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

December 3rd, 2015 at 6:10 am

ROBOTC Certification Courses Being Offered at this Spring’s ITEEA Conference!

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ITEEA_header

Robomatter and the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy are proud to offer Robotics Certification courses at the ITEEA National Harbor conference in Washington, DC on March 2nd and 3rd, 2016!

When you sign up for the training, you’ll get:

  • A Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy Certification course
  • Membership to ITEEA
  • Access to this year’s the ITEEA Conference at the National Harbor in Washington, D.C.

The courses that we are offering are Certification Courses. They will consist of two trainings sessions at the conference and four online classes after the conference. The online classes are offered once per week, are recorded, provide you with 24/7 access, and include forums that are enable you to get you questions answered on your schedule. There are two courses being offered, ROBOTC for LEGO training and ROBOTC for VEX training.

Each course will consist of:

  • Two (2) three-hour, on-site sessions at the ITEEA National Harbor conference
  • Four (4) additional online evening training sessions following the conference (or you could attend a summer online course)

Limited spots available! To register for the training or to learn more, visit: http://www.robotc.net/iteea/

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

December 1st, 2015 at 6:00 am

Released Today – ROBOTC 4.51 for VEX Robotics Preview!!

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ROBOTC 4-51 VEX

The ROBOTC Development Team is very excited to announce a public preview of ROBOTC 4.51. This update is for the VEX Robotics (VEX EDR CORTEX and VEX IQ) physical and virtual robotics systems and includes new features, improvements, and a load of bug fixes.

Click here to download the .exe file for 4.51!

Important Setup Information for ROBOTC 4.51:

VEX IQ Users:

  • Run the “VEX IQ Firmware Update Utility” and update your VEX IQ Brain to firmware version 1.15.
  • Also update your VEX IQ Wireless Controller and any other VEX IQ Devices (sensors, motors).
  • After updating to the latest VEX IQ Brain firmware, install the latest ROBOTC firmware from inside of ROBOTC.

VEX Cortex Users (with Black VEXnet 1.0 Keys):

  • You will need to update your VEX Cortex and VEX Game Controllers with Master Firmware Version 4.25 from inside of ROBOTC.
  • After updating the master firmware, you will also have to update the VEX Cortex with the latest ROBOTC firmware.

VEX Cortex Users (with White VEXnet 2.0 Keys):

  • The new VEXnet 2.0 keys have a specific “radio firmware” that you will need to upgrade to enable “Download and Debugging” support. You can download the VEXnet Key 2.0 Firmware Upgrade Utility here.
    • Download the “VEXnet Key 2.0 Firmware Upgrade Utility” and insert your VEXnet 2.0 key to any free USB port on your computer. Follow the instructions on the utility to update each key individually. All VEXnet 2.0 keys must be running the same version in order to function properly.
  • After updating your VEXnet 2.0 keys, you will need to update your VEX Cortex and VEX Game Controllers with Master Firmware Version 4.25 from inside of ROBOTC.
  • After updating the master firmware, you will also have to update the VEX Cortex with the latest ROBOTC firmware.

ROBOTC 4.50 —> 4.51 Change Log:

New Features and Improvements:

  • Added support for simple mathematical expressions in numerical text boxes in Graphical.

    Graphical_Math

  • Datalogging has been added for the VEX IQ platform.
  • Users can now log data from inside your program, with or without a timestamp.

    DataLogging4

  • Users can also configure motor, sensor and other values to be automatically polled at intervals as low as 10ms.

    DataLogging2

  • Users can view data in ROBOTC as it polled in and save to a .CSV file for additional analysis in a popular spreadsheet software.

    DataLogging3

  • You can use standard keyboard shortcuts to Select All, Copy, Cut and Paste in the Debugstream Window.
  • Natural Language Library Files have been enhanced for improved readability.
  • “Port with no Motor” has been added as an option for graphical blocks that use multiple motors – this will allow you to unselect a specific motor.
  • Graphical Copy and Paste has been improved to work better with comment blocks.
  • A flag (-SUPPRESS ) has been added to allow suppression of command line activation errors.
  • When compiling multiple files at once, the IDE will remain more responsive to user interaction.
  • A setMotorBrakeMode block has been added to Graphical, allowing motors to be set to either “float” or “brake”. This will allow motors to be setup as “free running”. This command can be found in “Expert” and above menu levels.
  • Additional programming samples have been added
  • User I2C commands for the Cortex has been implemented.
  • Users can now use custom I2C sensors within their programs – custom I2C commands are compatible with using the VEX Integrated Motor Encoders.

General Bug Fixes:

  • ‘Trial’ indicator displays correctly, regardless of license combinations.
  • Missing function added to the Function Library descriptions
  • Fixed and improved “hover over” tool tip help descriptions inside of the Function Library.
  • Resolved issue where the bottom of the Graphical Library view would not be cleared properly when scrolling
  • Char arrays with “\0” are properly initialized.
  • Selection of options inside of a Graphical Block can be reverted by using “undo”.
  • Fix potential RVW file read issue from crashing ROBOTC.
  • Several float-related issues resolved:
    • Compiler incorrectly optimizes constant expressions with ‘float’ operands.
    • Formatted printing does not work with negative floats
  • Using nSemaphore.nOwningTask comparison no longer generates a compiler warning
  • Two enum issues related to overflowed values have been fixed.
  • Functions returning pointers no longer generate errors when used in Boolean logic expressions.
  • Values from arrays of pointers assigned to another pointer, no longer cause errors.
  • setMotorBrakeMode commands take immediate effect, rather than after the first motor speed command.
  • Closing a source file could cause am unhandled exception under certain conditions, this has been resolved.
  • Compiling multiple Graphical programs at once no longer generates an error that there is no code to compile.
  • Fixed an issue where the Global Variable Base Address was incorrectly displayed.
  • RVW Package Manager will only self-elevate if multiple level packs are being installed.
  • Numerous small visual enhancements and fixes.

VEX Bug Fixes: 

  • VEX IQ no longer crashes when using Ternary String Decisions
  • Users are now alerted when a VEX IQ program exceeds the max allowed compiled program file size.
  • Fixed issue where using playSoundFile on VEX cortex would generate a compiler error
  • Compile errors in sample programs for the VEX IQ Smart Radio messaging have been resolved.
  • Fixed an issue where a disconnected Ultrasonic Sensor was not returning -1 when disconnected from the VEX Cortex.
  • Motors dialog pane for VEX Cortex now shows default motor names, rather than port names.
  • An enum for the VEX IQ data path values instead of using raw numbers, has been added.
  • Prevent users from using sscanf with floats on the VEX IQ to avoid crashing the brain

Click here to download the .exe file for 4.51!

Happy Programming!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

November 19th, 2015 at 5:50 pm

ROBOTC for LEGO MINDSTORMS 4.51 Preview Available Today!

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ROBOTC 4-51

The ROBOTC Development Team is happy to announce a public preview of ROBOTC 4.51! This update is for the LEGO MINDSTORMS (NXT and EV3) physical and virtual robotics systems and includes some great new features, improvements, and a load of bug fixes.

Click here to download the .exe file for 4.51!

Important Setup Information for ROBOTC 4.51:

LEGO NXT Users:

  • Simply update to the latest ROBOTC firmware from inside of ROBOTC.

LEGO EV3 Users:

  • All users will need to update the  LEGO EV3′s Kernel by connecting the EV3 and selecting “Robot Menu -> Download EV3 Linux Kernel” from inside of ROBOTC. The version number (1.07X) is the same to keep alignment with the EV3 Programming Software and LEGO’s releases.
  • After updating your EV3′s Linux Kernel, you’ll also need to update the ROBOTC firmware from inside of ROBOTC.

ROBOTC 4.50 —> 4.51 Change Log:

New Features and Improvements:

  • Added support for simple mathematical expressions in numerical text boxes in Graphical.
    Graphical_Math
  • Datalogging has been added for the EV3 platform.
  • Users can now log data from inside your program, with or without a timestamp.

    DataLogging4

  • Users can also configure motor, sensor and other values to be automatically polled at intervals as low as 10ms.

    DataLogging2

  • Users can view data in ROBOTC as it polled in and save to a .CSV file for additional analysis in a popular spreadsheet software.

    DataLogging3

  • Use standard keyboard shortcuts to Select All, Copy, Cut and Paste in the Debugstream Window.
  • Natural Language Library Files have been enhanced for improved readability.
  • “Port with no Motor” has been added as an option for graphical blocks that use multiple motors – this will allow you to unselect a specific motor.
  • Graphical Copy and Paste has been improved to work better with comment blocks.
  • A flag (-SUPPRESS ) has been added to allow suppression of command line activation errors.
  • When compiling multiple files at once, the IDE will remain more responsive to user interaction.
  • A setMotorBrakeMode block has been added to Graphical, allowing motors to be set to either “float” or “brake”. This will allow motors to be setup as “free running”. This command can be found in “Expert” and above menu levels.
  • Additional programming samples have been added

General Fixes:

  • ‘Trial’ indicator displays correctly, regardless of license combinations.
  • Missing function added to the Function Library descriptions
  • Fixed and improved “hover over” tool tip help descriptions inside of the Function Library.
  • Resolved issue where the bottom of the Graphical Library view would not be cleared properly when scrolling
  • Char arrays with “\0” are properly initialized.
  • Selection of options inside of a Graphical Block can be reverted by using “undo”.
    • Fix potential RVW file read issue from crashing ROBOTC.
  • Several float-related issues resolved:
    • Compiler incorrectly optimizes constant expressions with ‘float’ operands.
    • Formatted printing does not work with negative floats
  • Using nSemaphore.nOwningTask comparison no longer generates a compiler warning
  • Two enum issues related to overflowed values have been fixed.
  • Functions returning pointers no longer generate errors when used in Boolean logic expressions.
  • Values from arrays of pointers assigned to another pointer, no longer cause errors.
  • setMotorBrakeMode commands take immediate effect, rather than after the first motor speed command.
  • Closing a source file could cause am unhandled exception under certain conditions, this has been resolved.
  • Compiling multiple Graphical programs at once no longer generates an error that there is no code to compile.
  • Fixed an issue where the Global Variable Base Address was incorrectly displayed.
  • RVW Package Manager will only self-elevate if multiple level packs are being installed.
  • Numerous small visual enhancements and fixes.

MINDSTORMS Fixes: 

  • Changing the volume programmatically on an EV3 could cause a screen freeze when using the on-brick volume program after the program had exited.
  • Fixed issue where Casper is not cleaned up properly when the application exits.

Click here to download the .exe file for 4.51!

Happy Programming!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

November 19th, 2015 at 5:49 pm

VEX ROBOTC Online Trainings Start in February!

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VEX Teacher Training

Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy has announced their latest online VEX ROBOTC training schedule! The classes start in February and you can enjoy the convenience of taking Robotics Academy courses without leaving your own computer workstation! 

Register for one of their ROBOTC VEX classes today!

 
Benefits of Robotics Academy Online Training Courses:

  • Convenient online training gives you access from home or your school via the Internet.
  • Online access to supplemental lessons from other Robotics Academy materials.
  • Technical support for all hardware and software used in the class.
  • At the end of the course, take the certification test to become a Robotics Academy Certified Instructor.
  • Certificate of Completion upon course completion to apply for Continuing Education hours.
  • 24/7 access to class forums and message boards (monitored daily)


Robotics Academy Certified ROBOTC Online Training for VEX CORTEX

VEXROBOTC

This course focuses on learning how to program CORTEX robots, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts. Included with the course is online access to the Robotics Academy’s ROBOTC Video Trainer for CORTEX for one month starting the first day of class.

Feb 23rd – Mar 29th, 2016
Tuesdays for 6 weeks
6 – 8pm EST (3 – 5pm PST)

 


Robotics Academy Certified ROBOTC Online Training for VEX IQ

VEXIQROBOTC

This course focuses on learning how to program IQ robots, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts. Included with the course is a free copy of the VEX IQ curriculum (upon completion).

Feb 22nd – Mar 28th, 2016
Mondays for 6 weeks
6 – 8pm EST (3 – 5pm PST)
 

Register for one of their ROBOTC VEX classes today!

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

November 18th, 2015 at 6:05 am

Online LEGO Professional Development Courses Start this February!

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Teacher Training 2

Carnegie Mellon’s Robotics Academy has announced their latest online LEGO ROBOTC training schedule! The class starts in February and you can enjoy the convenience of taking Robotics Academy courses without leaving your own computer workstation!

Register for their ROBOTC EV3 class today!

Benefits of Robotics Academy Online Training Courses:

  • Convenient online training gives you access from home or your school via the Internet.
  • Online access to supplemental lessons from other Robotics Academy materials.
  • Technical support for all hardware and software used in the class.
  • At the end of the course, take the certification test to become a Robotics Academy Certified Instructor.
  • Certificate of Completion upon course completion to apply for Continuing Education hours.
  • 24/7 access to class forums and message boards (monitored daily)


Robotics Academy Certified ROBOTC Online Training for LEGO NXT and EV3

LEGOROBOTC

This course focuses on learning how to program NXT and EV3-based robots using ROBOTC, and how to use robotics as an organizer to teach STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics) concepts.

Feb 25th – Mar 31st, 2016
Thursdays for 6 weeks
6 – 8pm EST (3 – 5pm PST)
 
 

Register for their ROBOTC EV3 class today!

 

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

November 18th, 2015 at 6:00 am

Announcing the Mini Urban Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds!

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Mini Urban Challenge

We are very excited to announce a brand new Robot Virtual Worlds Competition, Mini Urban Challenge! Our new virtual simulation is based off the national competition sponsored by The Doolittle Institute, the Air Force Research Laboratory, and Special Operations Command.

 


 

The purpose of this competition is to design and program a robotic vehicle that can autonomously navigate a mini-urban city, using a virtual LEGO® MINDSTORMS® EV3 robot. The robot must enter the mini-urban city from a home base, travel through the city to assigned parking lots, park in any parking space in each assigned parking lot, and then exit the city by returning to the home base and parking in the home base. The robot should use the optimal path (shortest distance) through the mini-urban city to visit the parking lots. While in the city, the robot should obey traffic rules by stopping at stop signs and following standard right-of-way rules when other vehicles are encountered. You can find the official rule here.

Our new Robot Virtual World features three modes for the Mini Urban Challenge:

1. Practice Mode allows students to develop and test their code for the challenge, without worrying about scoring, penalties, or the clock.

2. Competition Mode is the standard version of the challenge field, complete with timing and scoring to reflect the real world competition.

2015-10-23_15-07-45

3. City Mode is an exciting, themed version of the challenge field, which also includes timing and scoring that reflect the real world competition.

2015-10-23_15-09-32

Download and install the Mini Urban Challenge for Robot Virtual Worlds here! To submit your scores and compete with others, you will need a free account from the Computer Science Student Network!

What’s the Big Idea? Using your STEM Classroom to Teach What Matters

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Computer Science

Computers are an everyday part of life. We use them constantly in our personal lives and in the workplace. According the the U.S. Bureau of Labor statistics, over 50% of jobs today require some level of technology skills. And, that percentage is expected to grow to almost 80% in the next ten years.

There’s no question that computer science skills are helping students succeed. But, computer science is about more than just learning to program. Students also need to learn how to think programmatically, to use programming as a problem-solving tool, and to understand the global impact of computer science and computing.

The most effective STEM programs include what are sometimes called the “Big Ideas” of computer science – foundational principles that are central to computing and help show students how computer science can change the world. Here’s a quick overview of some of the big ideas we think are important, and some tips on how you can incorporate them into your STEM Robotics or Computer Science classroom:

  1. Abstraction – Abstraction is a key problem-solving technique that we use in our everyday lives and that can be applied across disciplines and problems. Abstraction helps students manage complexity by reducing the information and details of a problem, allowing them to focus on the main idea. But how do you teach students abstraction?

One way is to Implement a project that start with a complex problem but uses mini-challenges to break the problem into smaller pieces. Have students solve the mini-challenges, focusing on one aspect of the problem at a time, and then use those mini-challenge solutions to build a final solution to the larger, more complex problem.

Algorithm2. Algorithms – Algorithms are used to develop and express computational problems and they’re an important part of Computer Science. But, algorithmic thinking is a tool that students can apply across disciplines and problems. Algorithmic thinking means defining a series of ordered steps you can take to solve a problem. Therefore, it’s important that students learn how to not only develop algorithms, but to also learn how to express algorithms in language, connect problems to algorithmic solutions, and evaluate algorithms effectively and analytically.

Here’s one idea for introducing algorithms into your STEM Robotics or Computer Science classroom: Provide students with a list of numbers. Ask them to find the largest number and document the procedure they used. (This is also good pseudocode practice!) Next, tell students that they will be given a program that generates 10 random numbers between 0 and 30 and they will have to provide an algorithm to find the largest number from the list. Once students have generated the algorithm and seen it in action, discuss why the algorithm is valuable. While it may not be a big deal to find the largest number out of a group of 10, what if we increased the range of numbers from 0 to 10,000, and increased the amount of numbers from 10 to 1000? In a situation like that, an algorithm would be able to find the largest number much faster than a human.

Computational
3. Computational Thinking – Computational thinking is a basic a problem-solving process that can be applied to any domain. This makes computational thinking an important skill for all students, and it’s why our curriculum is structured to teach students how to use computational thinking to be precise with their language, base their decisions on data, use a systematic way of thinking to recognize patterns and trends, and break down larger problems into smaller chunks that can be more easily solved.

To learn more about implementing computational thinking in your classroom, read our blog post from last month, “What is Computational Thinking and Why Should You Care?

Creativity4. Creativity – People often think that science and creativity are two terms that don’t belong together. However, that couldn’t be further from the truth. Innovation and creativity are at the heart of STEM and Computer Science. Along with programming skills, students need to learn how to think creatively and need to get comfortable with the creative process.

One great way to do this is by using structured problem-solving in your classroom. Structured problem-solving allows students to be creative, but within parameters. While students will still have opportunities to personalize their projects and justify their solutions, their creativity will still be structured. That way, teachers don’t have to worry about students constantly losing focus.

5. Data – This “Big Idea” revolves around the fact that data and information facilitate the creation of knowledge. Over the past 50 years, the tasks that we perform on a routine basis have gotten more and more complex. According to an analysis done by Frank Levy and Richard J. Murane, the amount that employees are asked to solve unstructured problems and acquire and make sense of new information has increased dramatically, by more than 40% .[i] Therefore, it’s important to teach students how to analyze and interpret data.

You can do this by having students use coordinate data to code precise movements. Or, ask students to design a short, school-appropriate survey to collect data and answer specific questions. Then, have students write a program to input and analyze their data and calculate basic descriptive statistics such as mean, mode, range, and frequency. You can also ask students to plot their data on a chart or graph, and identify subgroups within the dataset to explain response patterns. Finally ask students to draw conclusions or make generalizations from their data and present their results to the class.


2_2-4_mc_bossOnRoad6. Impact
– Computers have had a global impact on the way we think and live. The way we work, play, collaborate, communicate, and do business has changed dramatically in recent years and will likely continue to change. It’s important for students to understand the global impact of computing in everyday life, and the numerous ways computing helps enable innovation in other fields.

One way to help students understand the impact of computer science is to use activities that involve things like the internet, cybersecurity, internet searches, and the power of programming within advertising. You can also create activities that ask students to connect their programming skills to content from other classes (science, math, etc.). Or, you can ask students to think about and report on the less obvious ways they use technology every day, such as making breakfast, driving in a car, using the self-checkout line at the grocery store, etc.

7. Precision
– Programming is precise. It’s important for students to learn that a computer program will do exactly what they tell it to do. This is especially evident with robots. If you aren’t precise about what you tell your robots to do, they probably won’t do what you want. However, precision does not need to be complex. Even simple programming activities can require precise, thoughtful communication – How far should the robot move? How far should it turn?

 

 

Ultimately, we’re asking students to change the way they think about giving directions. So, a great activity is to have students create a set of instructions explaining how to do a task like following a recipe, drawing a house, or making a paper airplane. Have one student provide the instructions and a second student act as a robot, doing exactly what student #1 is telling him or her to do. Most times, it quickly becomes apparent that students have not fully considered the level of detail required for programming and that they need to be more precise with how they provide instructions.

If you’re looking for more ideas on how to integrate “Big Ideas” into your STEM classroom, we’ve embedded these “Big Ideas” into our research-based curriculum, which is available for free online, or through the purchase of a classroom edition that comes with the benefits of:

  • Guaranteed Uptime – Keep your classroom up, even if your internet is down.
  • Zero bandwidth requirements – 30 kids accessing the same curriculum can really slow things down.
  • High Quality Support – Have a question or need help getting started? You’ll have access to our best-in-class support team.
  • Individual curriculum access for each student or group – With individual access to the curriculum, students can move at the instructional pace that’s right for them.

 

[i] http://content.thirdway.org/publications/714/Dancing-With-Robots.pdf

Written by LeeAnn Baronett

November 11th, 2015 at 6:00 am

Cool Project: VEX IQ Game of Simon

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Cool ProjectDamien Kee, a VEX IQ Super User, designed a really cool and creative Game of Simon using a VEX IQ Smart Brain, three Touch LEDs, and programmed with ROBOTC.  He says, “This is my version of the Game of Simon for the VEX IQ. The TouchLED’s are an awesome input/output device that is just so natural to use. Programmed in ROBOTC and designed to be used as a way of teaching / reinforcing the concepts of arrays, in less than 100 lines of code.”

Check out the video below that shows it in action …

 

 

For a more detailed breakdown of the code, visit his website here. Damien also is sharing his code for others to use, which you can download here! (He just asks that if you do use it, please acknowledge and forgive any errors.)

Do you have a cool ROBOTC project you want to share with the world? If so, send us an email at socialmedia@robomatter.com and we’ll post it on our blog and social media pages!

Written by Cara Friez-LeWinter

November 2nd, 2015 at 6:00 am